Injuries in the Iowa certified safe farm study

Risto Rautiainen, Jeffrey L. Lange, Carol J. Hodne, Sara Schneiders, Kelley J. Donham

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aims of this article are to assess injury characteristics and risk factors in the Iowa Certified Safe Farm (CSF) program and to evaluate the effectiveness of CSF for reducing injuries. This intervention program includes a health screening, on-farm safety review, education, and monetary incentives. Cohorts of farmers in an intervention group (n = 152) and control group (n = 164) in northwestern Iowa were followed for a three-year period. During the follow-up, there were 318 injuries (42/100 person-years), of which 112 (15/100 person-years) required professional medical care. The monetary cost of injuries was $51,764 ($68 per farm per year). There were no differences in the self-reported injury rates and costs between the intervention and control groups. Raising livestock, poor general health, and exposures to dust and gas, noise, chemicals and pesticides, and lifting were among risk factors for injury. Most injuries in this study were related to animals, falls from elevation, slips/trips/falls, being struck by or struck against objects, lifting, and overexertion. Machinery was less prominent than generally reported in the literature. Hurry, fatigue, or stress were mentioned as the primary contributing factor in most injuries. These findings illustrate the need for new interventions to address a multitude of hazards in the farm work environment as well as management and organization of farm work.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages51-63
Number of pages13
Volume10
No1
Specialist publicationJournal of agricultural safety and health
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

Fingerprint

Farms
farms
Wounds and Injuries
risk factors
agricultural health and safety
farm programs
working conditions
health care workers
dust
education
Health
pesticides
Accidental Falls
livestock
gases
farmers
screening
Costs and Cost Analysis
Control Groups
Pesticides

Keywords

  • Accident
  • Agriculture
  • Injury
  • Injury cost
  • Injury risk factor
  • Safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Rautiainen, R., Lange, J. L., Hodne, C. J., Schneiders, S., & Donham, K. J. (2004). Injuries in the Iowa certified safe farm study. Journal of agricultural safety and health, 10(1), 51-63.

Injuries in the Iowa certified safe farm study. / Rautiainen, Risto; Lange, Jeffrey L.; Hodne, Carol J.; Schneiders, Sara; Donham, Kelley J.

In: Journal of agricultural safety and health, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.01.2004, p. 51-63.

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Rautiainen, R, Lange, JL, Hodne, CJ, Schneiders, S & Donham, KJ 2004, 'Injuries in the Iowa certified safe farm study' Journal of agricultural safety and health, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 51-63.
Rautiainen R, Lange JL, Hodne CJ, Schneiders S, Donham KJ. Injuries in the Iowa certified safe farm study. Journal of agricultural safety and health. 2004 Jan 1;10(1):51-63.
Rautiainen, Risto ; Lange, Jeffrey L. ; Hodne, Carol J. ; Schneiders, Sara ; Donham, Kelley J. / Injuries in the Iowa certified safe farm study. In: Journal of agricultural safety and health. 2004 ; Vol. 10, No. 1. pp. 51-63.
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