Inhibition of in vivo histamine metabolism in rats by foodborne and pharmacologic inhibitors of diamine oxidase, histamine N-methyltransferase, and monoamine oxidase

Julia Y. Hui, Steve L. Taylor

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81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When [14C]histamine was administered orally to rats, an average of 80% of the administered radioactivity was recovered in the urine at the end of 24 hr. About 10% of the total dose was excreted via the feces. Analysis of 4-hr urine samples found imidazoleacetic acid to be the predominant metabolite (60.6%), with Nτ-methylimidazoleacetic acid (8.6%), Nτ-methylhistamine (7.3%), and N-acetylhistamine (4.5%) to be the minor metabolites. Histamine metabolism was inhibited by simultaneous oral administration of aminoguanidine, isoniazid, quinacrine, cadaverine, putrescine, tyramine, and β-phenylethylamine. The administration of inhibitors resulted in an increased amount of unmetabolized histamine and a decreased amount of metabolites reaching the urine. Pharmacologic inhibitors were found to be more potent and have a longer duration of action than foodborne ones. The inhibitors could potentiate food poisoning caused by histamine by inhibiting its metabolism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)241-249
Number of pages9
JournalToxicology and Applied Pharmacology
Volume81
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1985

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Histamine N-Methyltransferase
Amine Oxidase (Copper-Containing)
Enzyme inhibition
Monoamine Oxidase
Metabolism
Histamine
Rats
Metabolites
Urine
Cadaverine
Phenethylamines
Quinacrine
Tyramine
Foodborne Diseases
Putrescine
Isoniazid
Radioactivity
Feces
Oral Administration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

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title = "Inhibition of in vivo histamine metabolism in rats by foodborne and pharmacologic inhibitors of diamine oxidase, histamine N-methyltransferase, and monoamine oxidase",
abstract = "When [14C]histamine was administered orally to rats, an average of 80{\%} of the administered radioactivity was recovered in the urine at the end of 24 hr. About 10{\%} of the total dose was excreted via the feces. Analysis of 4-hr urine samples found imidazoleacetic acid to be the predominant metabolite (60.6{\%}), with Nτ-methylimidazoleacetic acid (8.6{\%}), Nτ-methylhistamine (7.3{\%}), and N-acetylhistamine (4.5{\%}) to be the minor metabolites. Histamine metabolism was inhibited by simultaneous oral administration of aminoguanidine, isoniazid, quinacrine, cadaverine, putrescine, tyramine, and β-phenylethylamine. The administration of inhibitors resulted in an increased amount of unmetabolized histamine and a decreased amount of metabolites reaching the urine. Pharmacologic inhibitors were found to be more potent and have a longer duration of action than foodborne ones. The inhibitors could potentiate food poisoning caused by histamine by inhibiting its metabolism.",
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N2 - When [14C]histamine was administered orally to rats, an average of 80% of the administered radioactivity was recovered in the urine at the end of 24 hr. About 10% of the total dose was excreted via the feces. Analysis of 4-hr urine samples found imidazoleacetic acid to be the predominant metabolite (60.6%), with Nτ-methylimidazoleacetic acid (8.6%), Nτ-methylhistamine (7.3%), and N-acetylhistamine (4.5%) to be the minor metabolites. Histamine metabolism was inhibited by simultaneous oral administration of aminoguanidine, isoniazid, quinacrine, cadaverine, putrescine, tyramine, and β-phenylethylamine. The administration of inhibitors resulted in an increased amount of unmetabolized histamine and a decreased amount of metabolites reaching the urine. Pharmacologic inhibitors were found to be more potent and have a longer duration of action than foodborne ones. The inhibitors could potentiate food poisoning caused by histamine by inhibiting its metabolism.

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