Influence of computerized sounding out on spelling performance for children who do and do not rely on AAC

Jillian H. McCarthy, Tiffany P. Hogan, David R. Beukelman, Ilsa E. Schwarz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Spelling is an important skill for individuals who rely on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). The purpose of this study was to investigate how computerized sounding out influenced spelling accuracy of pseudo-words. Computerized sounding out was defined as a word elongated, thus providing an opportunity for a child to hear all the sounds in the word at a slower rate. Methods: Seven children with cerebral palsy, four who use AAC and three who do not, participated in a single subject AB design. Results: The results of the study indicated that the use of computerized sounding out increased the phonologic accuracy of the pseudo-words produced by participants. Conclusion: The study provides preliminary evidence for the use of computerized sounding out during spelling tasks for children with cerebral palsy who do and do not use AAC. Future directions and clinical implications are discussed.Implications for RehabilitationWe investigated how computerized sounding out influenced spelling accuracy of pseudowords for children with complex communication needs who did and did not use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC).Results indicated that the use of computerized sounding out increased the phonologic accuracy of the pseudo-words by participants, suggesting that computerized sounding out might assist in more accurate spelling for children who use AAC.Future research is needed to determine how language and reading abilities influence the use of computerized sounding out with children who have a range of speech intelligibilityabilities and do and do not use AAC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-230
Number of pages10
JournalDisability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

Fingerprint

Communication
Cerebral Palsy
Aptitude
Reading
Language
Acoustic waves

Keywords

  • AAC
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Phonological accuracy
  • Spelling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Rehabilitation
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Influence of computerized sounding out on spelling performance for children who do and do not rely on AAC. / McCarthy, Jillian H.; Hogan, Tiffany P.; Beukelman, David R.; Schwarz, Ilsa E.

In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, Vol. 10, No. 3, 01.05.2015, p. 221-230.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McCarthy, Jillian H. ; Hogan, Tiffany P. ; Beukelman, David R. ; Schwarz, Ilsa E. / Influence of computerized sounding out on spelling performance for children who do and do not rely on AAC. In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 3. pp. 221-230.
@article{b99d7f2b647041c78787253a0de47186,
title = "Influence of computerized sounding out on spelling performance for children who do and do not rely on AAC",
abstract = "Purpose: Spelling is an important skill for individuals who rely on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). The purpose of this study was to investigate how computerized sounding out influenced spelling accuracy of pseudo-words. Computerized sounding out was defined as a word elongated, thus providing an opportunity for a child to hear all the sounds in the word at a slower rate. Methods: Seven children with cerebral palsy, four who use AAC and three who do not, participated in a single subject AB design. Results: The results of the study indicated that the use of computerized sounding out increased the phonologic accuracy of the pseudo-words produced by participants. Conclusion: The study provides preliminary evidence for the use of computerized sounding out during spelling tasks for children with cerebral palsy who do and do not use AAC. Future directions and clinical implications are discussed.Implications for RehabilitationWe investigated how computerized sounding out influenced spelling accuracy of pseudowords for children with complex communication needs who did and did not use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC).Results indicated that the use of computerized sounding out increased the phonologic accuracy of the pseudo-words by participants, suggesting that computerized sounding out might assist in more accurate spelling for children who use AAC.Future research is needed to determine how language and reading abilities influence the use of computerized sounding out with children who have a range of speech intelligibilityabilities and do and do not use AAC.",
keywords = "AAC, Cerebral palsy, Phonological accuracy, Spelling",
author = "McCarthy, {Jillian H.} and Hogan, {Tiffany P.} and Beukelman, {David R.} and Schwarz, {Ilsa E.}",
year = "2015",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3109/17483107.2014.883650",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
pages = "221--230",
journal = "Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology",
issn = "1748-3115",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of computerized sounding out on spelling performance for children who do and do not rely on AAC

AU - McCarthy, Jillian H.

AU - Hogan, Tiffany P.

AU - Beukelman, David R.

AU - Schwarz, Ilsa E.

PY - 2015/5/1

Y1 - 2015/5/1

N2 - Purpose: Spelling is an important skill for individuals who rely on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). The purpose of this study was to investigate how computerized sounding out influenced spelling accuracy of pseudo-words. Computerized sounding out was defined as a word elongated, thus providing an opportunity for a child to hear all the sounds in the word at a slower rate. Methods: Seven children with cerebral palsy, four who use AAC and three who do not, participated in a single subject AB design. Results: The results of the study indicated that the use of computerized sounding out increased the phonologic accuracy of the pseudo-words produced by participants. Conclusion: The study provides preliminary evidence for the use of computerized sounding out during spelling tasks for children with cerebral palsy who do and do not use AAC. Future directions and clinical implications are discussed.Implications for RehabilitationWe investigated how computerized sounding out influenced spelling accuracy of pseudowords for children with complex communication needs who did and did not use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC).Results indicated that the use of computerized sounding out increased the phonologic accuracy of the pseudo-words by participants, suggesting that computerized sounding out might assist in more accurate spelling for children who use AAC.Future research is needed to determine how language and reading abilities influence the use of computerized sounding out with children who have a range of speech intelligibilityabilities and do and do not use AAC.

AB - Purpose: Spelling is an important skill for individuals who rely on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). The purpose of this study was to investigate how computerized sounding out influenced spelling accuracy of pseudo-words. Computerized sounding out was defined as a word elongated, thus providing an opportunity for a child to hear all the sounds in the word at a slower rate. Methods: Seven children with cerebral palsy, four who use AAC and three who do not, participated in a single subject AB design. Results: The results of the study indicated that the use of computerized sounding out increased the phonologic accuracy of the pseudo-words produced by participants. Conclusion: The study provides preliminary evidence for the use of computerized sounding out during spelling tasks for children with cerebral palsy who do and do not use AAC. Future directions and clinical implications are discussed.Implications for RehabilitationWe investigated how computerized sounding out influenced spelling accuracy of pseudowords for children with complex communication needs who did and did not use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC).Results indicated that the use of computerized sounding out increased the phonologic accuracy of the pseudo-words by participants, suggesting that computerized sounding out might assist in more accurate spelling for children who use AAC.Future research is needed to determine how language and reading abilities influence the use of computerized sounding out with children who have a range of speech intelligibilityabilities and do and do not use AAC.

KW - AAC

KW - Cerebral palsy

KW - Phonological accuracy

KW - Spelling

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84925161829&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84925161829&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3109/17483107.2014.883650

DO - 10.3109/17483107.2014.883650

M3 - Article

C2 - 24512195

AN - SCOPUS:84925161829

VL - 10

SP - 221

EP - 230

JO - Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology

JF - Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology

SN - 1748-3115

IS - 3

ER -