Infection control in long-term care facilities

Philip Welsch Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

There are more nursing home or long-term care beds in the United States than acute-care hospital beds. The residents of these facilities, usually elderly, are at risk for infection due to failing immunity and the opportunity for cross-infection. The leading nosocomial infections are urinary tract infections, respiratory infections and infected pressure ulcers. Both endemic and epidemic infections are common. Infection control programmes designed to prevent long-term care infections address such issues as surveillance of infections, epidemic detection, isolation policies, and prevention of resistant bacteria. The role of the physician in long-term care infection control is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)151-166
Number of pages16
JournalBailliere's Clinical Infectious Diseases
Volume5
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

Fingerprint

Long-Term Care
Infection Control
Cross Infection
Infection
Physician's Role
Pressure Ulcer
Nursing Homes
Urinary Tract Infections
Respiratory Tract Infections
Immunity
Bacteria

Keywords

  • Epidemic
  • Infection control
  • Long-term care facility
  • Nosocomial
  • Nursing home

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Infection control in long-term care facilities. / Smith, Philip Welsch.

In: Bailliere's Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 5, No. 1, 01.01.1998, p. 151-166.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Smith, Philip Welsch. / Infection control in long-term care facilities. In: Bailliere's Clinical Infectious Diseases. 1998 ; Vol. 5, No. 1. pp. 151-166.
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