Infant temperament moderates relations between maternal parenting in early childhood and children's adjustment in first grade

Anne Dopkins Stright, Kathleen Cranley Gallagher, Ken Kelley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

119 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A differential susceptibility hypothesis proposes that children may differ in the degree to which parenting qualities affect aspects of child development. Infants with difficult temperaments may be more susceptible to the effects of parenting than infants with less difficult temperaments. Using latent change curve analyses to analyze data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care, the current study found that temperament moderated associations between maternal parenting styles during early childhood and children's first-grade academic competence, social skills, and relationships with teachers and peers. Relations between parenting and first-grade outcomes were stronger for difficult than for less difficult infants. Infants with difficult temperaments had better adjustment than less difficult infants when parenting quality was high and poorer adjustment when parenting quality was lower.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)186-200
Number of pages15
JournalChild development
Volume79
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

Fingerprint

Social Adjustment
Temperament
Parenting
infant
school grade
childhood
Mothers
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (U.S.)
parenting style
social competence
child care
Child Care
Child Development
Mental Competency
teacher
health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Infant temperament moderates relations between maternal parenting in early childhood and children's adjustment in first grade. / Stright, Anne Dopkins; Gallagher, Kathleen Cranley; Kelley, Ken.

In: Child development, Vol. 79, No. 1, 01.01.2008, p. 186-200.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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