Induction of oil accumulation by heat stress is metabolically distinct from N stress in the green microalgae Coccomyxa subellipsoidea C169

James W. Allen, Rahul Tevatia, Yaşar Demirel, Concetta C DiRusso, Paul N Black

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Algae are often promoted as feedstock organisms to produce a sustainable petroleum fossil fuel alternative. However, to induce lipid accumulation most often requires a severe stress that is difficult to induce in large batch cultures. The objective of this study is to analyze and mathematically model heat stress on growth, chlorophyll content, triacylglyceride, and starch synthesis in algae. We initially screened 30 algal species for the most pronounced induction of lipid droplets from heat stress using confocal microscopy and mass spectroscopy techniques. One species, Coccomyxa subellipsoidea C169, was selected and subjected to further biochemical analyses using a jacketed bioreactor amended with 1% CO 2 at 25°C, 30°C, 32°C, 33°C, 34°C, 35°C, and 36°C. Lipid and starch accumulation was less extreme than N stress. Growth was reduced above 25°C, but heat stress induced lipid droplet synthesis was negatively correlated with growth only past a demonstrated threshold temperature above 32°C. The optimal temperature for lipid accumulation was 35°C, which led to 6% of dry weight triglyceride content and a 72% reduction from optimal growth after 5 days. Fatty acid influx rates into triglycerides and 15N labeling of amino acids and proteins indicate that heat stress is mechanistically distinct from N stress. Thus, this study lends support to a novel hypothesis that lipid droplet triglycerides result from a redistribution of carbon flux as fatty acids to neutral storage lipids over membrane or other lipids.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0204505
JournalPloS one
Volume13
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2018

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Coccomyxa
Microalgae
microalgae
heat stress
Oils
Hot Temperature
Lipids
oils
Triglycerides
lipids
Growth
algae
Starch
Fatty Acids
Fossil Fuels
droplets
Carbon Cycle
Batch Cell Culture Techniques
Temperature
triacylglycerols

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Induction of oil accumulation by heat stress is metabolically distinct from N stress in the green microalgae Coccomyxa subellipsoidea C169. / Allen, James W.; Tevatia, Rahul; Demirel, Yaşar; DiRusso, Concetta C; Black, Paul N.

In: PloS one, Vol. 13, No. 9, e0204505, 09.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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