Individual differences in delay discounting: Relation to intelligence, working memory, and anterior prefrontal cortex

Noah A. Shamosh, Colin G. DeYoung, Adam E. Green, Deidre L. Reis, Matthew R. Johnson, Andrew R.A. Conway, Randall W. Engle, Todd S. Braver, Jeremy R. Gray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

273 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lower delay discounting (better self-control) is linked to higher intelligence, but the basis of this relation is uncertain. To investigate the potential role of working memory (WM) processes, we assessed delay discounting, intelligence (g), WM (span tasks, 3-back task), and WM-related neural activity (using functional magnetic resonance imaging) in 103 healthy adults. Delay discounting was negatively correlated with g and WM. WM explained no variance in delay discounting beyond that explained by g, which suggests that processes through which WM relates to delay discounting are shared by g. WM-related neural activity in left anterior prefrontal cortex (Brodmann's area 10) covaried with g, r =.26, and delay discounting, r = -.40, and partially mediated the relation between g and delay discounting. Overall, the results suggest that delay discounting is associated with intelligence in part because of processes instantiated in anterior prefrontal cortex, a region known to support the integration of diverse information. ©

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)904-911
Number of pages8
JournalPsychological Science
Volume19
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2008

Fingerprint

Prefrontal Cortex
Intelligence
Short-Term Memory
Individuality
Delay Discounting
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Individual differences in delay discounting : Relation to intelligence, working memory, and anterior prefrontal cortex. / Shamosh, Noah A.; DeYoung, Colin G.; Green, Adam E.; Reis, Deidre L.; Johnson, Matthew R.; Conway, Andrew R.A.; Engle, Randall W.; Braver, Todd S.; Gray, Jeremy R.

In: Psychological Science, Vol. 19, No. 9, 01.09.2008, p. 904-911.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shamosh, NA, DeYoung, CG, Green, AE, Reis, DL, Johnson, MR, Conway, ARA, Engle, RW, Braver, TS & Gray, JR 2008, 'Individual differences in delay discounting: Relation to intelligence, working memory, and anterior prefrontal cortex', Psychological Science, vol. 19, no. 9, pp. 904-911. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9280.2008.02175.x
Shamosh, Noah A. ; DeYoung, Colin G. ; Green, Adam E. ; Reis, Deidre L. ; Johnson, Matthew R. ; Conway, Andrew R.A. ; Engle, Randall W. ; Braver, Todd S. ; Gray, Jeremy R. / Individual differences in delay discounting : Relation to intelligence, working memory, and anterior prefrontal cortex. In: Psychological Science. 2008 ; Vol. 19, No. 9. pp. 904-911.
@article{04628bf9ce534627be8ba857686f339c,
title = "Individual differences in delay discounting: Relation to intelligence, working memory, and anterior prefrontal cortex",
abstract = "Lower delay discounting (better self-control) is linked to higher intelligence, but the basis of this relation is uncertain. To investigate the potential role of working memory (WM) processes, we assessed delay discounting, intelligence (g), WM (span tasks, 3-back task), and WM-related neural activity (using functional magnetic resonance imaging) in 103 healthy adults. Delay discounting was negatively correlated with g and WM. WM explained no variance in delay discounting beyond that explained by g, which suggests that processes through which WM relates to delay discounting are shared by g. WM-related neural activity in left anterior prefrontal cortex (Brodmann's area 10) covaried with g, r =.26, and delay discounting, r = -.40, and partially mediated the relation between g and delay discounting. Overall, the results suggest that delay discounting is associated with intelligence in part because of processes instantiated in anterior prefrontal cortex, a region known to support the integration of diverse information. {\circledC}",
author = "Shamosh, {Noah A.} and DeYoung, {Colin G.} and Green, {Adam E.} and Reis, {Deidre L.} and Johnson, {Matthew R.} and Conway, {Andrew R.A.} and Engle, {Randall W.} and Braver, {Todd S.} and Gray, {Jeremy R.}",
year = "2008",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1467-9280.2008.02175.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
pages = "904--911",
journal = "Psychological Science",
issn = "0956-7976",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Individual differences in delay discounting

T2 - Relation to intelligence, working memory, and anterior prefrontal cortex

AU - Shamosh, Noah A.

AU - DeYoung, Colin G.

AU - Green, Adam E.

AU - Reis, Deidre L.

AU - Johnson, Matthew R.

AU - Conway, Andrew R.A.

AU - Engle, Randall W.

AU - Braver, Todd S.

AU - Gray, Jeremy R.

PY - 2008/9/1

Y1 - 2008/9/1

N2 - Lower delay discounting (better self-control) is linked to higher intelligence, but the basis of this relation is uncertain. To investigate the potential role of working memory (WM) processes, we assessed delay discounting, intelligence (g), WM (span tasks, 3-back task), and WM-related neural activity (using functional magnetic resonance imaging) in 103 healthy adults. Delay discounting was negatively correlated with g and WM. WM explained no variance in delay discounting beyond that explained by g, which suggests that processes through which WM relates to delay discounting are shared by g. WM-related neural activity in left anterior prefrontal cortex (Brodmann's area 10) covaried with g, r =.26, and delay discounting, r = -.40, and partially mediated the relation between g and delay discounting. Overall, the results suggest that delay discounting is associated with intelligence in part because of processes instantiated in anterior prefrontal cortex, a region known to support the integration of diverse information. ©

AB - Lower delay discounting (better self-control) is linked to higher intelligence, but the basis of this relation is uncertain. To investigate the potential role of working memory (WM) processes, we assessed delay discounting, intelligence (g), WM (span tasks, 3-back task), and WM-related neural activity (using functional magnetic resonance imaging) in 103 healthy adults. Delay discounting was negatively correlated with g and WM. WM explained no variance in delay discounting beyond that explained by g, which suggests that processes through which WM relates to delay discounting are shared by g. WM-related neural activity in left anterior prefrontal cortex (Brodmann's area 10) covaried with g, r =.26, and delay discounting, r = -.40, and partially mediated the relation between g and delay discounting. Overall, the results suggest that delay discounting is associated with intelligence in part because of processes instantiated in anterior prefrontal cortex, a region known to support the integration of diverse information. ©

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=54049092894&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=54049092894&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-9280.2008.02175.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1467-9280.2008.02175.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 18947356

AN - SCOPUS:54049092894

VL - 19

SP - 904

EP - 911

JO - Psychological Science

JF - Psychological Science

SN - 0956-7976

IS - 9

ER -