Individual and Environmental Sources of Work Stress Among Prison Officers

Benjamin Steiner, John Wooldredge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Work stress has been linked to a number of negative outcomes for employees and organizations. Drawing from the Job Demand–Control (–Support) model, we examined the influences of work stress among more than 1,800 prison officers working in 45 prisons across Ohio and Kentucky. Multilevel analyses revealed that individual factors such as experiencing victimization and greater job demands were related to more stress among prison officers, whereas perceived control over inmates and support from coworkers and supervisors were associated with less stress. Facility violence was also linked to higher levels of officer stress across prisons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)800-818
Number of pages19
JournalCriminal Justice and Behavior
Volume42
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 16 2015

Fingerprint

prison officer
Prisons
correctional institution
job demand
co-worker
Multilevel Analysis
victimization
Crime Victims
Violence
employee
violence
Organizations

Keywords

  • job control
  • job demand
  • job support
  • prison officer
  • work stress
  • workplace safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Psychology(all)
  • Law

Cite this

Individual and Environmental Sources of Work Stress Among Prison Officers. / Steiner, Benjamin; Wooldredge, John.

In: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Vol. 42, No. 8, 16.08.2015, p. 800-818.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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