Independent and joint effects of socioeconomic, behavioral, and neighborhood characteristics on physical inactivity and activity levels among US children and adolescents

Gopal K. Singh, Michael D. Kogan, Mohammad Siahpush, Peter C. Van Dyck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the independent and joint associations between several socioeconomic and behavioral characteristics and physical activity (PA) and inactivity prevalence among 68,288 US children aged 6-17 years. The 2003 National Survey of Children's Health was used to estimate PA prevalence. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate odds of activity and inactivity and adjusted prevalence, while least squares regression was used to model mean number of days of physical inactivity (PIA) in past month. The prevalence of PA varied substantially by socioeconomic and behavioral characteristics, with older, female, non-English speaking, and metropolitan children and those with lower socioeconomic status (SES) and neighborhood social capital having higher inactivity and lower activity levels. Children who watched television ≤3 h/day had 60% higher adjusted odds of PIA and 30% lower odds of PA than those who watched television <3 h/day. Children experiencing inadequate sleep during the entire week had 55% higher odds of PIA and 29% lower odds of PA than those who experienced ≥5 nights of adequate sleep during the week. Children whose both parents were physically inactive had 147% higher odds of PIA and 46% lower odds of PA than children whose parents were both physically active. Differentials in PIA by ethnicity, SES, television viewing, and parental inactivity were greater for younger than for older children. Subgroups such as older, female adolescents, children from socially disadvantaged households and neighborhoods, and those in metropolitan areas should be targeted for the promotion of regular physical activity and reduced television viewing time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)206-216
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Community Health
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2008

Fingerprint

Exercise
adolescent
Television
television
Social Class
sleep
Sleep
Parents
social status
parents
regression
Vulnerable Populations
female adolescent
Least-Squares Analysis
social capital
speaking
Logistic Models
agglomeration area
promotion
ethnicity

Keywords

  • Childhood physical activity
  • Ethnicity
  • Inactivity
  • Neighborhood safety
  • Parental behavior
  • Sleep deprivation
  • Social capital
  • Socioeconomic status
  • Television viewing
  • United States

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Independent and joint effects of socioeconomic, behavioral, and neighborhood characteristics on physical inactivity and activity levels among US children and adolescents. / Singh, Gopal K.; Kogan, Michael D.; Siahpush, Mohammad; Van Dyck, Peter C.

In: Journal of Community Health, Vol. 33, No. 4, 01.08.2008, p. 206-216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{af0de1a6de8749739f360a26477e8c87,
title = "Independent and joint effects of socioeconomic, behavioral, and neighborhood characteristics on physical inactivity and activity levels among US children and adolescents",
abstract = "This study examines the independent and joint associations between several socioeconomic and behavioral characteristics and physical activity (PA) and inactivity prevalence among 68,288 US children aged 6-17 years. The 2003 National Survey of Children's Health was used to estimate PA prevalence. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate odds of activity and inactivity and adjusted prevalence, while least squares regression was used to model mean number of days of physical inactivity (PIA) in past month. The prevalence of PA varied substantially by socioeconomic and behavioral characteristics, with older, female, non-English speaking, and metropolitan children and those with lower socioeconomic status (SES) and neighborhood social capital having higher inactivity and lower activity levels. Children who watched television ≤3 h/day had 60{\%} higher adjusted odds of PIA and 30{\%} lower odds of PA than those who watched television <3 h/day. Children experiencing inadequate sleep during the entire week had 55{\%} higher odds of PIA and 29{\%} lower odds of PA than those who experienced ≥5 nights of adequate sleep during the week. Children whose both parents were physically inactive had 147{\%} higher odds of PIA and 46{\%} lower odds of PA than children whose parents were both physically active. Differentials in PIA by ethnicity, SES, television viewing, and parental inactivity were greater for younger than for older children. Subgroups such as older, female adolescents, children from socially disadvantaged households and neighborhoods, and those in metropolitan areas should be targeted for the promotion of regular physical activity and reduced television viewing time.",
keywords = "Childhood physical activity, Ethnicity, Inactivity, Neighborhood safety, Parental behavior, Sleep deprivation, Social capital, Socioeconomic status, Television viewing, United States",
author = "Singh, {Gopal K.} and Kogan, {Michael D.} and Mohammad Siahpush and {Van Dyck}, {Peter C.}",
year = "2008",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10900-008-9094-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
pages = "206--216",
journal = "Journal of Community Health",
issn = "0094-5145",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Independent and joint effects of socioeconomic, behavioral, and neighborhood characteristics on physical inactivity and activity levels among US children and adolescents

AU - Singh, Gopal K.

AU - Kogan, Michael D.

AU - Siahpush, Mohammad

AU - Van Dyck, Peter C.

PY - 2008/8/1

Y1 - 2008/8/1

N2 - This study examines the independent and joint associations between several socioeconomic and behavioral characteristics and physical activity (PA) and inactivity prevalence among 68,288 US children aged 6-17 years. The 2003 National Survey of Children's Health was used to estimate PA prevalence. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate odds of activity and inactivity and adjusted prevalence, while least squares regression was used to model mean number of days of physical inactivity (PIA) in past month. The prevalence of PA varied substantially by socioeconomic and behavioral characteristics, with older, female, non-English speaking, and metropolitan children and those with lower socioeconomic status (SES) and neighborhood social capital having higher inactivity and lower activity levels. Children who watched television ≤3 h/day had 60% higher adjusted odds of PIA and 30% lower odds of PA than those who watched television <3 h/day. Children experiencing inadequate sleep during the entire week had 55% higher odds of PIA and 29% lower odds of PA than those who experienced ≥5 nights of adequate sleep during the week. Children whose both parents were physically inactive had 147% higher odds of PIA and 46% lower odds of PA than children whose parents were both physically active. Differentials in PIA by ethnicity, SES, television viewing, and parental inactivity were greater for younger than for older children. Subgroups such as older, female adolescents, children from socially disadvantaged households and neighborhoods, and those in metropolitan areas should be targeted for the promotion of regular physical activity and reduced television viewing time.

AB - This study examines the independent and joint associations between several socioeconomic and behavioral characteristics and physical activity (PA) and inactivity prevalence among 68,288 US children aged 6-17 years. The 2003 National Survey of Children's Health was used to estimate PA prevalence. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate odds of activity and inactivity and adjusted prevalence, while least squares regression was used to model mean number of days of physical inactivity (PIA) in past month. The prevalence of PA varied substantially by socioeconomic and behavioral characteristics, with older, female, non-English speaking, and metropolitan children and those with lower socioeconomic status (SES) and neighborhood social capital having higher inactivity and lower activity levels. Children who watched television ≤3 h/day had 60% higher adjusted odds of PIA and 30% lower odds of PA than those who watched television <3 h/day. Children experiencing inadequate sleep during the entire week had 55% higher odds of PIA and 29% lower odds of PA than those who experienced ≥5 nights of adequate sleep during the week. Children whose both parents were physically inactive had 147% higher odds of PIA and 46% lower odds of PA than children whose parents were both physically active. Differentials in PIA by ethnicity, SES, television viewing, and parental inactivity were greater for younger than for older children. Subgroups such as older, female adolescents, children from socially disadvantaged households and neighborhoods, and those in metropolitan areas should be targeted for the promotion of regular physical activity and reduced television viewing time.

KW - Childhood physical activity

KW - Ethnicity

KW - Inactivity

KW - Neighborhood safety

KW - Parental behavior

KW - Sleep deprivation

KW - Social capital

KW - Socioeconomic status

KW - Television viewing

KW - United States

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=44649167639&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=44649167639&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10900-008-9094-8

DO - 10.1007/s10900-008-9094-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 18373183

AN - SCOPUS:44649167639

VL - 33

SP - 206

EP - 216

JO - Journal of Community Health

JF - Journal of Community Health

SN - 0094-5145

IS - 4

ER -