Increasing the saliency of behavior-consequence relations for children with autism who exhibit persistent errors

Wayne W Fisher, Tamara L. Pawich, Nitasha Dickes, Amber R. Paden, Karen Toussaint

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Some children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) display persistent errors that are not responsive to commonly used prompting or error-correction strategies; one possible reason for this is that the behavior-consequence relations are not readily discriminable (Davison & Nevin, 1999). In this study, we increased the discriminability of the behavior-consequence relations in conditional-discrimination acquisition tasks for 3 children with ASD using schedule manipulations in concert with a unique visual display designed to increase the saliency of the differences between consequences in effect for correct responding and for errors. A multiple baseline design across participants was used to show that correct responding increased for all participants, and, after 1 or more exposures to the intervention, correct responding persisted to varying degrees across participants when the differential reinforcement baseline was reintroduced to assess maintenance. These findings suggest that increasing the saliency of behavior-consequence relations may help to increase correct responding in children with ASD who exhibit persistent errors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)738-748
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of applied behavior analysis
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

Fingerprint

Autistic Disorder
autism
Appointments and Schedules
Maintenance
reinforcement
manipulation
discrimination
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Consequence Relation
Autism Spectrum Disorders
Autism

Keywords

  • acquisition
  • autism
  • conditional discrimination
  • discrete-trial training
  • discriminated operant
  • error correction
  • response cost
  • schedule discrimination
  • second-order schedule

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Philosophy
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Increasing the saliency of behavior-consequence relations for children with autism who exhibit persistent errors. / Fisher, Wayne W; Pawich, Tamara L.; Dickes, Nitasha; Paden, Amber R.; Toussaint, Karen.

In: Journal of applied behavior analysis, Vol. 47, No. 4, 01.12.2014, p. 738-748.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fisher, Wayne W ; Pawich, Tamara L. ; Dickes, Nitasha ; Paden, Amber R. ; Toussaint, Karen. / Increasing the saliency of behavior-consequence relations for children with autism who exhibit persistent errors. In: Journal of applied behavior analysis. 2014 ; Vol. 47, No. 4. pp. 738-748.
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