Incorporating Spirituality into Health Sciences Education

Toby L. Schonfeld, Kendra K Schmid, Deborah Boucher-Payne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Researchers are beginning to collect empiric data about coping mechanisms of health science students. Yet, there is an important aspect of coping with stress that is only partially addressed in health sciences curricula: students’ spiritual well-being. In this essay, we describe a course in spirituality and health care that we offered to fourth-year medical students, as well as a small empirical study we conducted to assess students’ spiritual needs and practices. We then offer reflections on the broad applicability of this work to students in the health sciences more generally, including suggestions for curriculum interventions that may ensure students’ success.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)85-96
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Religion and Health
Volume55
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Fingerprint

Spirituality
Health Education
Students
Curriculum
Health
Medical Students
Research Personnel
Science Education
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Coping mechanisms
  • Medical students
  • Religion and health care
  • Spirituality
  • Stress and students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Religious studies

Cite this

Incorporating Spirituality into Health Sciences Education. / Schonfeld, Toby L.; Schmid, Kendra K; Boucher-Payne, Deborah.

In: Journal of Religion and Health, Vol. 55, No. 1, 01.02.2016, p. 85-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schonfeld, Toby L. ; Schmid, Kendra K ; Boucher-Payne, Deborah. / Incorporating Spirituality into Health Sciences Education. In: Journal of Religion and Health. 2016 ; Vol. 55, No. 1. pp. 85-96.
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