In vitro production of anti histone antibodies by spleen cells from young autoantibody negative NZB/NZW mice

James Robert O'Dell, B. L. Kotzin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Anti-histone antibodies (AHA) are spontaneously produced in NZB/NZW mice as part of their autoimmune disease. IgM AHA are usually not detected until after 4 mo of age, and older female mice switch to the production of IgG AHA. We studied the in vitro production of AHA by spleen cells from young (≤ 12-wk-old) NZB/NZW mice. Despite the absence of elevated serum AHA activity, spleen cells from these mice demonstrated marked spontaneous autoantibody production in culture. In kinetic studies, little in vitro production was detectable after 1 day of culture, and maximal accumulation occurred on day 5. Elevated AHA production was apparent by cells from 2-wk-old NZB/NZW mice, and an age-dependent increase in autoantibody production was also noted. Only AHA of the IgM class were detected in cultures of young spleen cells. The in vitro production of IgM AHA in culture was T cell dependent, depletion of T cells resulting in a 70 to 90% reduction in production, which was corrected by the readdition of T cells. In cultures where both IgM AHA and total IgM secretion were measured, a much greater T cell dependence for AHA production was apparent. The requirement for T cells could also be partially replaced by factors present in concanavalin A supernatant. AHA secretion was induced by lipopolysaccharide by using cells from both NZB/NZW and non-autoimmune mice. Although production was greater with NZB/NZW cells, the difference was much less than that for spontaneous production. Thus, AHA-secreting cells that are dependent on in vitro T cell help are present in young NZB/NZW mice. These studies may help define the mechanisms responsible for selective autoantibody secretion in lupus-like disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1101-1107
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume135
Issue number2
StatePublished - Dec 1 1985
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Inbred NZB Mouse
Autoantibodies
Histones
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Spleen
Immunoglobulin M
T-Lymphocytes
Antibody Formation
In Vitro Techniques
Antibody-Producing Cells
Immunoglobulin Isotypes
Concanavalin A
Autoimmune Diseases
Lipopolysaccharides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

In vitro production of anti histone antibodies by spleen cells from young autoantibody negative NZB/NZW mice. / O'Dell, James Robert; Kotzin, B. L.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 135, No. 2, 01.12.1985, p. 1101-1107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e2418384c9cf43268ae83c3c8c2f6d5c,
title = "In vitro production of anti histone antibodies by spleen cells from young autoantibody negative NZB/NZW mice",
abstract = "Anti-histone antibodies (AHA) are spontaneously produced in NZB/NZW mice as part of their autoimmune disease. IgM AHA are usually not detected until after 4 mo of age, and older female mice switch to the production of IgG AHA. We studied the in vitro production of AHA by spleen cells from young (≤ 12-wk-old) NZB/NZW mice. Despite the absence of elevated serum AHA activity, spleen cells from these mice demonstrated marked spontaneous autoantibody production in culture. In kinetic studies, little in vitro production was detectable after 1 day of culture, and maximal accumulation occurred on day 5. Elevated AHA production was apparent by cells from 2-wk-old NZB/NZW mice, and an age-dependent increase in autoantibody production was also noted. Only AHA of the IgM class were detected in cultures of young spleen cells. The in vitro production of IgM AHA in culture was T cell dependent, depletion of T cells resulting in a 70 to 90{\%} reduction in production, which was corrected by the readdition of T cells. In cultures where both IgM AHA and total IgM secretion were measured, a much greater T cell dependence for AHA production was apparent. The requirement for T cells could also be partially replaced by factors present in concanavalin A supernatant. AHA secretion was induced by lipopolysaccharide by using cells from both NZB/NZW and non-autoimmune mice. Although production was greater with NZB/NZW cells, the difference was much less than that for spontaneous production. Thus, AHA-secreting cells that are dependent on in vitro T cell help are present in young NZB/NZW mice. These studies may help define the mechanisms responsible for selective autoantibody secretion in lupus-like disease.",
author = "O'Dell, {James Robert} and Kotzin, {B. L.}",
year = "1985",
month = "12",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "135",
pages = "1101--1107",
journal = "Journal of Immunology",
issn = "0022-1767",
publisher = "American Association of Immunologists",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - In vitro production of anti histone antibodies by spleen cells from young autoantibody negative NZB/NZW mice

AU - O'Dell, James Robert

AU - Kotzin, B. L.

PY - 1985/12/1

Y1 - 1985/12/1

N2 - Anti-histone antibodies (AHA) are spontaneously produced in NZB/NZW mice as part of their autoimmune disease. IgM AHA are usually not detected until after 4 mo of age, and older female mice switch to the production of IgG AHA. We studied the in vitro production of AHA by spleen cells from young (≤ 12-wk-old) NZB/NZW mice. Despite the absence of elevated serum AHA activity, spleen cells from these mice demonstrated marked spontaneous autoantibody production in culture. In kinetic studies, little in vitro production was detectable after 1 day of culture, and maximal accumulation occurred on day 5. Elevated AHA production was apparent by cells from 2-wk-old NZB/NZW mice, and an age-dependent increase in autoantibody production was also noted. Only AHA of the IgM class were detected in cultures of young spleen cells. The in vitro production of IgM AHA in culture was T cell dependent, depletion of T cells resulting in a 70 to 90% reduction in production, which was corrected by the readdition of T cells. In cultures where both IgM AHA and total IgM secretion were measured, a much greater T cell dependence for AHA production was apparent. The requirement for T cells could also be partially replaced by factors present in concanavalin A supernatant. AHA secretion was induced by lipopolysaccharide by using cells from both NZB/NZW and non-autoimmune mice. Although production was greater with NZB/NZW cells, the difference was much less than that for spontaneous production. Thus, AHA-secreting cells that are dependent on in vitro T cell help are present in young NZB/NZW mice. These studies may help define the mechanisms responsible for selective autoantibody secretion in lupus-like disease.

AB - Anti-histone antibodies (AHA) are spontaneously produced in NZB/NZW mice as part of their autoimmune disease. IgM AHA are usually not detected until after 4 mo of age, and older female mice switch to the production of IgG AHA. We studied the in vitro production of AHA by spleen cells from young (≤ 12-wk-old) NZB/NZW mice. Despite the absence of elevated serum AHA activity, spleen cells from these mice demonstrated marked spontaneous autoantibody production in culture. In kinetic studies, little in vitro production was detectable after 1 day of culture, and maximal accumulation occurred on day 5. Elevated AHA production was apparent by cells from 2-wk-old NZB/NZW mice, and an age-dependent increase in autoantibody production was also noted. Only AHA of the IgM class were detected in cultures of young spleen cells. The in vitro production of IgM AHA in culture was T cell dependent, depletion of T cells resulting in a 70 to 90% reduction in production, which was corrected by the readdition of T cells. In cultures where both IgM AHA and total IgM secretion were measured, a much greater T cell dependence for AHA production was apparent. The requirement for T cells could also be partially replaced by factors present in concanavalin A supernatant. AHA secretion was induced by lipopolysaccharide by using cells from both NZB/NZW and non-autoimmune mice. Although production was greater with NZB/NZW cells, the difference was much less than that for spontaneous production. Thus, AHA-secreting cells that are dependent on in vitro T cell help are present in young NZB/NZW mice. These studies may help define the mechanisms responsible for selective autoantibody secretion in lupus-like disease.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0022401458&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0022401458&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 135

SP - 1101

EP - 1107

JO - Journal of Immunology

JF - Journal of Immunology

SN - 0022-1767

IS - 2

ER -