Improving insulin ordering safely: The development of an inpatient glycemic control program

Rachel Thompson, Astrid B. Schreuder, Brent Wisse, Kenny Jarman, Kathleen Givan, Louise Suhr, Dawn Corl, Becky Pierce, Robert Knopp, J. Richard Goss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This report describes a Glycemic Control Program instituted at an academic regional level-one trauma center. Key interventions included: 1) development of a subcutaneous insulin physician order set, 2) use of a real-time data report to identify patients with out-of-range glucoses, and 3) implementation of a clinical intervention team. Over four years 18,087 patients admitted to non-critical care wards met our criteria as dysglycemic patients. In this population, glycemic control interventions were associated with increased basal and decreased sliding scale insulin ordering. No decrease was observed in the percent of patients experiencing hperglycemia. Hypoglycemia did decline after the interventions (4.3% to 3.6%; p =0.003). Distinguishing characteristics of this Glycemic Control Program include the use of real-time data to identify patients with out-of-range glucoses and the employment of a single clinician to cover all non-critical care floors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E30-E35
JournalJournal of hospital medicine
Volume4
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2009

Fingerprint

Inpatients
Insulin
Glucose
Trauma Centers
Hypoglycemia
Physicians
Population

Keywords

  • Glucose
  • Glycemic control
  • Health care outcomes
  • Improvement
  • Quality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management
  • Internal Medicine
  • Fundamentals and skills
  • Health Policy
  • Care Planning
  • Assessment and Diagnosis

Cite this

Thompson, R., Schreuder, A. B., Wisse, B., Jarman, K., Givan, K., Suhr, L., ... Goss, J. R. (2009). Improving insulin ordering safely: The development of an inpatient glycemic control program. Journal of hospital medicine, 4(7), E30-E35. https://doi.org/10.1002/jhm.494

Improving insulin ordering safely : The development of an inpatient glycemic control program. / Thompson, Rachel; Schreuder, Astrid B.; Wisse, Brent; Jarman, Kenny; Givan, Kathleen; Suhr, Louise; Corl, Dawn; Pierce, Becky; Knopp, Robert; Goss, J. Richard.

In: Journal of hospital medicine, Vol. 4, No. 7, 01.09.2009, p. E30-E35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thompson, R, Schreuder, AB, Wisse, B, Jarman, K, Givan, K, Suhr, L, Corl, D, Pierce, B, Knopp, R & Goss, JR 2009, 'Improving insulin ordering safely: The development of an inpatient glycemic control program', Journal of hospital medicine, vol. 4, no. 7, pp. E30-E35. https://doi.org/10.1002/jhm.494
Thompson, Rachel ; Schreuder, Astrid B. ; Wisse, Brent ; Jarman, Kenny ; Givan, Kathleen ; Suhr, Louise ; Corl, Dawn ; Pierce, Becky ; Knopp, Robert ; Goss, J. Richard. / Improving insulin ordering safely : The development of an inpatient glycemic control program. In: Journal of hospital medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 4, No. 7. pp. E30-E35.
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