Improving fruit and vegetable consumption: Use of farm-to-consumer venues among US adults

Heidi M. Blanck, Olivia M. Thompson, Linda Nebeling, Amy L. Yaroch

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26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Improvements to the food environment including new store development and more farm-to-consumer approaches (ie, farmers' markets, roadside stands, pick-your-own produce farms, or community-supported agriculture programs) may aid Americans in making healthier dietary choices. We analyzed data from a subset of respondents (N = 1,994) in the National Cancer Institute's Food Attitudes and Behaviors Survey, a mail survey of US adults. We determined associations between primary grocery shoppers' region and sociodemographic characteristics and frequency of purchasing fruits and vegetables in the summer from farm-to-consumer venues. A little more than one-quarter (27%) of grocery shoppers reported a frequency of at least weekly use of farm-to-consumer approaches. Older adults and respondents who live in the Northeast were most likely to shop farm-to-consumer venues at least weekly, and no differences were found by sex, race/ethnicity, education, or annual household income. These findings suggest that farm-to-consumer venues are used by many Americans and could be expanded to increase access to fruits and vegetables.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberA49
JournalPreventing Chronic Disease
Volume8
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2011

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Blanck, H. M., Thompson, O. M., Nebeling, L., & Yaroch, A. L. (2011). Improving fruit and vegetable consumption: Use of farm-to-consumer venues among US adults. Preventing Chronic Disease, 8(2), [A49].