Improvement of visual function with glare testing after photorefractive keratectomy and radial keratotomy

Brian S.Boxer Wachler, Daniel S. Durrie, Kerry K. Assil, Ronald R. Krueger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of a glare source on visual function in patients after photorefractive keratectomy and radial keratotomy. METHODS: Thirteen patients (22 eyes) who underwent photorefractive keratectomy and 20 patients (40 eyes) who underwent radial keratotomy were evaluated in this cross-sectional study. LogMAR visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were measured. Pupils were measured with the Rosenbaum card. A halogen/tungsten glare source approximated the luminance of headlights of an oncoming car at 100 feet. RESULTS: In the photorefractive keratectomy and radial keratotomy groups, pupils were significantly smaller (P < .01) and the pupillary clearance of the ablation zone in photorefractive keratectomy and the clear zone in radial keratotomy were significantly larger under the glare condition (P < .01). In the photorefractive keratectomy group, visual acuity and contrast sensitivity under the glare condition were significantly higher than in the no-glare condition (P = .02). In the radial keratotomy group, contrast sensitivity under the glare condition was significantly higher than under the no-glare condition (P = .001 to .003). CONCLUSIONS: After photorefractive keratectomy or radial keratotomy, the traditional glare source constricted the pupil and partially masked the optical aberrations, which resulted in an improvement in visual function. A 'pupil-sparing' aberration test is needed for evaluation of visual function after refractive surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)582-587
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of ophthalmology
Volume128
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 1999

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Radial Keratotomy
Glare
Photorefractive Keratectomy
Contrast Sensitivity
Pupil
Visual Acuity
Miosis
Refractive Surgical Procedures
Tungsten
Halogens
Cross-Sectional Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Improvement of visual function with glare testing after photorefractive keratectomy and radial keratotomy. / Wachler, Brian S.Boxer; Durrie, Daniel S.; Assil, Kerry K.; Krueger, Ronald R.

In: American journal of ophthalmology, Vol. 128, No. 5, 01.11.1999, p. 582-587.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wachler, Brian S.Boxer ; Durrie, Daniel S. ; Assil, Kerry K. ; Krueger, Ronald R. / Improvement of visual function with glare testing after photorefractive keratectomy and radial keratotomy. In: American journal of ophthalmology. 1999 ; Vol. 128, No. 5. pp. 582-587.
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