Implicit and explicit trust behavior: Does stereotype congruence affect user trust in a home automation device?

Nicole B. Damen, Christine A. Toh

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Although trust is widely accepted as important for technology adoption and usage, it has received little attention in home automation, where users interact closely with these devices to enhance their quality of life. Research is needed to investigate how design considerations such as agent gender and automation location impact trust. This study expands on a pilot study by examining how stereotype congruence impacts implicit and explicit measures of trust in home automation devices. A smart lock simulation was utilized to examine how users interacted with systems that confirm and violate social expectations. The results show that users displayed more trusting behavior towards systems that were stereotype congruent than incongruent. That is, users extended their expectations of stereotypical social behaviors to their interaction with the home automation simulation. In addition explicit trust measures, or directly observable behaviors, differed from implicit trust measures, such as reaction time with the system. These findings provide a foundation for empirically testing and understanding the complex relationship between users and increasingly social automated devices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication30th International Conference on Design Theory and Methodology
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
ISBN (Electronic)9780791851845
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
EventASME 2018 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2018 - Quebec City, Canada
Duration: Aug 26 2018Aug 29 2018

Publication series

NameProceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference
Volume7

Other

OtherASME 2018 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2018
CountryCanada
CityQuebec City
Period8/26/188/29/18

Fingerprint

Congruence
Automation
Technology Adoption
Social Behavior
Quality of Life
Reaction Time
Congruent
Violate
Expand
Simulation
Testing
Interaction

Keywords

  • Agent voice
  • Automated agent
  • Design for trust
  • Gender
  • Home automation
  • Implicit trust
  • Location
  • Reaction time
  • Smart homes
  • Stereotype congruence
  • Trust behavior
  • Trustworthiness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Modeling and Simulation

Cite this

Damen, N. B., & Toh, C. A. (2018). Implicit and explicit trust behavior: Does stereotype congruence affect user trust in a home automation device? In 30th International Conference on Design Theory and Methodology (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference; Vol. 7). American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2018-86091

Implicit and explicit trust behavior : Does stereotype congruence affect user trust in a home automation device? / Damen, Nicole B.; Toh, Christine A.

30th International Conference on Design Theory and Methodology. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2018. (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference; Vol. 7).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Damen, NB & Toh, CA 2018, Implicit and explicit trust behavior: Does stereotype congruence affect user trust in a home automation device? in 30th International Conference on Design Theory and Methodology. Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference, vol. 7, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), ASME 2018 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2018, Quebec City, Canada, 8/26/18. https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2018-86091
Damen NB, Toh CA. Implicit and explicit trust behavior: Does stereotype congruence affect user trust in a home automation device? In 30th International Conference on Design Theory and Methodology. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). 2018. (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2018-86091
Damen, Nicole B. ; Toh, Christine A. / Implicit and explicit trust behavior : Does stereotype congruence affect user trust in a home automation device?. 30th International Conference on Design Theory and Methodology. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2018. (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference).
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