Implementing smoking cessation guidelines for hospitalized veterans

Effects on nurse attitudes and performance

David A. Katz, John Holman, Skyler Johnson, Stephen L. Hillis, Sarah Ono, Kenda Stewart, Monica Paez, Steven Fu, Kathleen M Grant, Lynne M Buchanan, Allan Prochazka, Catherine Battaglia, Marita Titler, Mark W. Vander Weg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: A minority of hospitalized smokers actually receives assistance in quitting during hospitalization or cessation counseling following discharge. This study aims to determine the impact of a guideline-based intervention on 1) nurses' delivery of the 5A's (Ask-Advise-Assess-Assist-Arrange follow-up) in hospitalized smokers, and 2) nurses' attitudes toward the intervention. METHODS: We conducted a pre-post guideline implementation trial involving 205 hospitalized smokers on the inpatient medicine units at one US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) medical center. The intervention included: 1) academic detailing of nurses on delivery of brief cessation counseling, 2) modification of the admission form to facilitate 5A's documentation, and 3) referral of motivated inpatients to receive proactive telephone counseling. Based on subject interviews, we calculated a nursing 5A's composite score for each patient (ranging from 0 to 9). We used linear regression with generalized estimating equations to compare the 5A's composite score (and logistic regression to compare individual A's) across periods. We compared 29 nurses' ratings of their self-efficacy and decisional balance ("pros" and "cons") with regard to cessation counseling before and after guideline implementation. Following implementation, we also interviewed a purposeful sample of nurses to assess their attitudes toward the intervention. RESULTS: Of 193 smokers who completed the pre-discharge interview, the mean nursing 5A's composite score was higher after guideline implementation (3.9 vs. 3.1, adjusted difference 1.0, 95 % CI 0.5-1.6). More patients were advised to quit (62 vs. 48 %, adjusted OR = 2.1, 95 % CI = 1.2-3.5) and were assisted in quitting (70 vs. 45 %, adjusted OR = 2.9, 95 % CI = 1.6-5.3) by a nurse during the post-implementation period. Nurses' attitudes toward cessation counseling improved following guideline implementation (35.3 vs. 32.7 on "pros" subscale, p = 0.01), without significant change on the "cons" subscale. CONCLUSIONS: A multifaceted intervention including academic detailing and adaptation of the nursing admission template is an effective strategy for improving nurses' delivery of brief cessation counseling in medical inpatients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1420-1429
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of General Internal Medicine
Volume28
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

Fingerprint

Veterans
Smoking Cessation
Nurses
Guidelines
Counseling
Inpatients
Nursing
Interviews
United States Department of Veterans Affairs
Self Efficacy
Telephone
Documentation
Linear Models
Hospitalization
Referral and Consultation
Logistic Models
Medicine

Keywords

  • Veterans
  • counseling
  • guideline-based intervention
  • smoking cessation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Katz, D. A., Holman, J., Johnson, S., Hillis, S. L., Ono, S., Stewart, K., ... Vander Weg, M. W. (2013). Implementing smoking cessation guidelines for hospitalized veterans: Effects on nurse attitudes and performance. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 28(11), 1420-1429. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-013-2464-7

Implementing smoking cessation guidelines for hospitalized veterans : Effects on nurse attitudes and performance. / Katz, David A.; Holman, John; Johnson, Skyler; Hillis, Stephen L.; Ono, Sarah; Stewart, Kenda; Paez, Monica; Fu, Steven; Grant, Kathleen M; Buchanan, Lynne M; Prochazka, Allan; Battaglia, Catherine; Titler, Marita; Vander Weg, Mark W.

In: Journal of General Internal Medicine, Vol. 28, No. 11, 01.11.2013, p. 1420-1429.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Katz, DA, Holman, J, Johnson, S, Hillis, SL, Ono, S, Stewart, K, Paez, M, Fu, S, Grant, KM, Buchanan, LM, Prochazka, A, Battaglia, C, Titler, M & Vander Weg, MW 2013, 'Implementing smoking cessation guidelines for hospitalized veterans: Effects on nurse attitudes and performance', Journal of General Internal Medicine, vol. 28, no. 11, pp. 1420-1429. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-013-2464-7
Katz, David A. ; Holman, John ; Johnson, Skyler ; Hillis, Stephen L. ; Ono, Sarah ; Stewart, Kenda ; Paez, Monica ; Fu, Steven ; Grant, Kathleen M ; Buchanan, Lynne M ; Prochazka, Allan ; Battaglia, Catherine ; Titler, Marita ; Vander Weg, Mark W. / Implementing smoking cessation guidelines for hospitalized veterans : Effects on nurse attitudes and performance. In: Journal of General Internal Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 28, No. 11. pp. 1420-1429.
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N2 - BACKGROUND: A minority of hospitalized smokers actually receives assistance in quitting during hospitalization or cessation counseling following discharge. This study aims to determine the impact of a guideline-based intervention on 1) nurses' delivery of the 5A's (Ask-Advise-Assess-Assist-Arrange follow-up) in hospitalized smokers, and 2) nurses' attitudes toward the intervention. METHODS: We conducted a pre-post guideline implementation trial involving 205 hospitalized smokers on the inpatient medicine units at one US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) medical center. The intervention included: 1) academic detailing of nurses on delivery of brief cessation counseling, 2) modification of the admission form to facilitate 5A's documentation, and 3) referral of motivated inpatients to receive proactive telephone counseling. Based on subject interviews, we calculated a nursing 5A's composite score for each patient (ranging from 0 to 9). We used linear regression with generalized estimating equations to compare the 5A's composite score (and logistic regression to compare individual A's) across periods. We compared 29 nurses' ratings of their self-efficacy and decisional balance ("pros" and "cons") with regard to cessation counseling before and after guideline implementation. Following implementation, we also interviewed a purposeful sample of nurses to assess their attitudes toward the intervention. RESULTS: Of 193 smokers who completed the pre-discharge interview, the mean nursing 5A's composite score was higher after guideline implementation (3.9 vs. 3.1, adjusted difference 1.0, 95 % CI 0.5-1.6). More patients were advised to quit (62 vs. 48 %, adjusted OR = 2.1, 95 % CI = 1.2-3.5) and were assisted in quitting (70 vs. 45 %, adjusted OR = 2.9, 95 % CI = 1.6-5.3) by a nurse during the post-implementation period. Nurses' attitudes toward cessation counseling improved following guideline implementation (35.3 vs. 32.7 on "pros" subscale, p = 0.01), without significant change on the "cons" subscale. CONCLUSIONS: A multifaceted intervention including academic detailing and adaptation of the nursing admission template is an effective strategy for improving nurses' delivery of brief cessation counseling in medical inpatients.

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