Impaired perception of self-motion (heading) in abstinent ecstasy and marijuana users

Matthew Rizzo, C. T.J. Lamers, C. G. Sauer, J. G. Ramaekers, A. Bechara, G. J. Andersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rationale: Illicit drug use can increase driver crash risk due to loss of control over vehicle trajectory. This study asks, does recreational use of ±3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; marijuana) impair cognitive processes that help direct our safe movement through the world? Objective: This study assesses the residual effects of combined MDMA/THC use, and of THC use alone, upon perceived trajectory of travel. Methods: Perception of self-motion, or heading, from optical flow patterns was assessed using stimuli comprising random dot ground planes presented at three different densities and eight heading angles (1, 2, 4 and 8° to the left or right). On each trial, subjects reported if direction of travel was to the left or the right. Results: Results showed impairments in both drug groups, with the MDMA/THC group performing the worst. Conclusions: The finding that these psychoactive agents adversely affect heading perception, even in recently abstinent users, raises potential concerns about MDMA use and driving ability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)559-566
Number of pages8
JournalPsychopharmacology
Volume179
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Motion Perception
N-Methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine
Dronabinol
Cannabis
Aptitude
Psychotropic Drugs
Street Drugs
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Driving
  • MDMA
  • Substance abuse
  • THC
  • Visual motion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Rizzo, M., Lamers, C. T. J., Sauer, C. G., Ramaekers, J. G., Bechara, A., & Andersen, G. J. (2005). Impaired perception of self-motion (heading) in abstinent ecstasy and marijuana users. Psychopharmacology, 179(3), 559-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00213-004-2100-7

Impaired perception of self-motion (heading) in abstinent ecstasy and marijuana users. / Rizzo, Matthew; Lamers, C. T.J.; Sauer, C. G.; Ramaekers, J. G.; Bechara, A.; Andersen, G. J.

In: Psychopharmacology, Vol. 179, No. 3, 01.05.2005, p. 559-566.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rizzo, M, Lamers, CTJ, Sauer, CG, Ramaekers, JG, Bechara, A & Andersen, GJ 2005, 'Impaired perception of self-motion (heading) in abstinent ecstasy and marijuana users', Psychopharmacology, vol. 179, no. 3, pp. 559-566. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00213-004-2100-7
Rizzo, Matthew ; Lamers, C. T.J. ; Sauer, C. G. ; Ramaekers, J. G. ; Bechara, A. ; Andersen, G. J. / Impaired perception of self-motion (heading) in abstinent ecstasy and marijuana users. In: Psychopharmacology. 2005 ; Vol. 179, No. 3. pp. 559-566.
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