Impacts of a child care quality rating and improvement system on child care quality

Kimberly Boller, Diane Paulsell, Patricia Del Grosso, Randall Blair, Eric Lundquist, Danielle Z. Kassow, Rachel Kim, Hilary A Raikes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This evaluation rigorously assessed the implementation and impact of a child care Quality Rating and Improvement System (QRIS) field test on child care quality as measured through child care quality observations and through ratings of a set of quality, education, and experience standards defined by policymakers and stakeholders. The 6-month QRIS intervention (implemented in 2009) consisted of four components: (1) quality standards in two areas, curriculum and learning environment and professional development and training; (2) a process for assigning ratings based on the quality standards; (3) a package of quality improvement supports for providers; and (4) financial incentives. A total of 52 family child care providers and 14 child care centers with demonstrated baseline equivalence participated in this experiment. Half of the family child care providers and half of the centers were randomly assigned to the QRIS treatment group or to a no-treatment control group. At the 6-month follow-up, the QRIS treatment group had significantly higher observed quality scores, but there was no impact on the overall QRIS rating. Implications for states developing or modifying QRIS and limitations of the evaluation are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)306-315
Number of pages10
JournalEarly Childhood Research Quarterly
Volume30
Issue numberPB
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Child Care
Quality Improvement
child care
rating
Curriculum
Motivation
Learning
Education
Group
Control Groups
equivalence
evaluation
learning environment
stakeholder
incentive

Keywords

  • Child care quality
  • Coaching
  • Early childhood education and care
  • QRIS
  • Quality improvement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Impacts of a child care quality rating and improvement system on child care quality. / Boller, Kimberly; Paulsell, Diane; Grosso, Patricia Del; Blair, Randall; Lundquist, Eric; Kassow, Danielle Z.; Kim, Rachel; Raikes, Hilary A.

In: Early Childhood Research Quarterly, Vol. 30, No. PB, 2015, p. 306-315.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Boller, K, Paulsell, D, Grosso, PD, Blair, R, Lundquist, E, Kassow, DZ, Kim, R & Raikes, HA 2015, 'Impacts of a child care quality rating and improvement system on child care quality', Early Childhood Research Quarterly, vol. 30, no. PB, pp. 306-315. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2014.10.001
Boller, Kimberly ; Paulsell, Diane ; Grosso, Patricia Del ; Blair, Randall ; Lundquist, Eric ; Kassow, Danielle Z. ; Kim, Rachel ; Raikes, Hilary A. / Impacts of a child care quality rating and improvement system on child care quality. In: Early Childhood Research Quarterly. 2015 ; Vol. 30, No. PB. pp. 306-315.
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