Impact of nicotine withdrawal on novelty reward and related behaviors

Joyce Besheer, Rick A Bevins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors tested the decreased reward function hypothesis of nicotine withdrawal using a novel-object place conditioning task. A conditioned place preference was evident in controls and in rats that had experienced 4 nicotine withdrawal days, but not in rats that had experienced 1-3 withdrawal days. This implies that the rewarding properties of interacting with novel objects were not readily associated with the environment in which they were paired. Follow-up experiments eliminated other explanations based on withdrawal-induced failures to process object or environment information. Also, expression of conditioning was not affected, indicating that withdrawal likely altered acquisition. Further investigation into the neurochemical and behavioral changes that accompany nicotine withdrawal will lead to a better understanding of the withdrawal syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)327-340
Number of pages14
JournalBehavioral Neuroscience
Volume117
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2003

Fingerprint

Nicotine
Reward
Conditioning (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Impact of nicotine withdrawal on novelty reward and related behaviors. / Besheer, Joyce; Bevins, Rick A.

In: Behavioral Neuroscience, Vol. 117, No. 2, 01.04.2003, p. 327-340.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e20d9a3c18344569b417035d55f7a545,
title = "Impact of nicotine withdrawal on novelty reward and related behaviors",
abstract = "The authors tested the decreased reward function hypothesis of nicotine withdrawal using a novel-object place conditioning task. A conditioned place preference was evident in controls and in rats that had experienced 4 nicotine withdrawal days, but not in rats that had experienced 1-3 withdrawal days. This implies that the rewarding properties of interacting with novel objects were not readily associated with the environment in which they were paired. Follow-up experiments eliminated other explanations based on withdrawal-induced failures to process object or environment information. Also, expression of conditioning was not affected, indicating that withdrawal likely altered acquisition. Further investigation into the neurochemical and behavioral changes that accompany nicotine withdrawal will lead to a better understanding of the withdrawal syndrome.",
author = "Joyce Besheer and Bevins, {Rick A}",
year = "2003",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1037/0735-7044.117.2.327",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "117",
pages = "327--340",
journal = "Behavioral Neuroscience",
issn = "0735-7044",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of nicotine withdrawal on novelty reward and related behaviors

AU - Besheer, Joyce

AU - Bevins, Rick A

PY - 2003/4/1

Y1 - 2003/4/1

N2 - The authors tested the decreased reward function hypothesis of nicotine withdrawal using a novel-object place conditioning task. A conditioned place preference was evident in controls and in rats that had experienced 4 nicotine withdrawal days, but not in rats that had experienced 1-3 withdrawal days. This implies that the rewarding properties of interacting with novel objects were not readily associated with the environment in which they were paired. Follow-up experiments eliminated other explanations based on withdrawal-induced failures to process object or environment information. Also, expression of conditioning was not affected, indicating that withdrawal likely altered acquisition. Further investigation into the neurochemical and behavioral changes that accompany nicotine withdrawal will lead to a better understanding of the withdrawal syndrome.

AB - The authors tested the decreased reward function hypothesis of nicotine withdrawal using a novel-object place conditioning task. A conditioned place preference was evident in controls and in rats that had experienced 4 nicotine withdrawal days, but not in rats that had experienced 1-3 withdrawal days. This implies that the rewarding properties of interacting with novel objects were not readily associated with the environment in which they were paired. Follow-up experiments eliminated other explanations based on withdrawal-induced failures to process object or environment information. Also, expression of conditioning was not affected, indicating that withdrawal likely altered acquisition. Further investigation into the neurochemical and behavioral changes that accompany nicotine withdrawal will lead to a better understanding of the withdrawal syndrome.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037380419&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037380419&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/0735-7044.117.2.327

DO - 10.1037/0735-7044.117.2.327

M3 - Article

C2 - 12708529

AN - SCOPUS:0037380419

VL - 117

SP - 327

EP - 340

JO - Behavioral Neuroscience

JF - Behavioral Neuroscience

SN - 0735-7044

IS - 2

ER -