Impact of carrier gas flow rate on the synthesis of nanodiamonds via microplasma technique

Saman Iqbal, Muhammad Shahid Rafique, Muhammad Zahid, Shazia Bashir, Muhammad Ashfaq Ahmad, Rabia Ahmad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nanodiamonds (NDs) have been fabricated utilizing micro plasma facility. The mixture of argon as carrier gas and ethanol as precursor has been dissociated in micro plasma. The argon flow rate was varied from 4 to 9 l/min. The influence of argon gas flow rates on structural, surface and optical properties of NDs was compared. An increased amount of diamond has been reported with the increase in flow rate, obtaining the maximum value at 6 l/min. Further increase in flow rate starts decreasing the quality of NDs. Raman and XRD confirm that the smallest size and stress free NDs are obtained at 6 l/min argon flow rate. AFM micrograph also reveals the smallest size of NDs ~27 nm for 6 l/min argon flow rate. The hydrophobicity of NDs increases with increasing argon flow rate as confirmed by FTIR. Photoluminescence indicates the presence of nitrogen vacancy defect centers such as N3, H3 and NV for all the flow rates. The smallest PL peak intensity at 6 l/min argon flow rate indicates the lowest density of vacancy defects in the diamond. UV–Visible spectroscopy indicates the presence of nitrogen-hydrogen defect and nitrogen vacancy defect centers (N4 and N5). The largest band gap at 6 l/min argon flow rate also confirms the highest quality of NDs. The centers offer promising applications as, active laser material, fluorescent markers, quantum information, nanoscale magnetic and electric filed sensors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-41
Number of pages11
JournalMaterials Science in Semiconductor Processing
Volume74
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nanodiamonds
microplasmas
Argon
gas flow
Flow of gases
flow velocity
Flow rate
argon
synthesis
Vacancies
Defects
Diamond
Nitrogen
defects
nitrogen
Diamonds
diamonds
Plasmas
laser materials
Hydrophobicity

Keywords

  • Hydrophobicity
  • Microplasma
  • Nanodiamonds
  • Nitrogen vacancy defect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Impact of carrier gas flow rate on the synthesis of nanodiamonds via microplasma technique. / Iqbal, Saman; Rafique, Muhammad Shahid; Zahid, Muhammad; Bashir, Shazia; Ahmad, Muhammad Ashfaq; Ahmad, Rabia.

In: Materials Science in Semiconductor Processing, Vol. 74, 01.02.2018, p. 31-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Iqbal, Saman ; Rafique, Muhammad Shahid ; Zahid, Muhammad ; Bashir, Shazia ; Ahmad, Muhammad Ashfaq ; Ahmad, Rabia. / Impact of carrier gas flow rate on the synthesis of nanodiamonds via microplasma technique. In: Materials Science in Semiconductor Processing. 2018 ; Vol. 74. pp. 31-41.
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