Impact of candidate sire number and sire relatedness on DNA polymorphism-based measures of exclusion probability and probability of unambiguous parentage

G. B. Sherman, S. D. Kachman, L. L. Hungerford, G. P. Rupp, C. P. Fox, M. D. Brown, B. M. Feuz, T. R. Holm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Genetic paternity testing can provide sire identity data for offspring when females have been exposed to multiple males. However, correct paternity assignment can be influenced by factors determined in the laboratory and by size and genetic composition of breeding groups. In the present study, DNA samples from 26 commingled beef bulls and their calves from the Nebraska Reference Herd-1 (NRH1), along with previously reported Illinois Reference/ Resource Families data, were used to estimate the impact of sire number and sire relatedness on microsatellite-based paternity testing. Assay performance was measured by exclusion probabilities and probabilities of unambiguous parentage (PUP) were derived. Proportion of calves with unambiguous parentage (PCUP) was also calculated to provide a readily understandable whole-herd measure of unambiguous paternity assignment. For NRH1, theoretical and observed PCUP values were in close agreement (85.3 and 85.8%, respectively) indicating good predictive value. While the qualitative effects on PUP values of altering sire number and sire relatedness were generally predictable, we demonstrate that the impacts of these variables, and their interaction effects, can be large, are non-linear, and are quantitatively distinct for different combinations of sire number and degree of sire relatedness. In view of the potentially complex dynamics and practical consequences of these relationships in both research and animal production settings, we suggest that a priori estimation of the quantitative impact of a given set of interacting breeding group-specific and assay-specific parameters on PUP may be indicated, particularly when candidate sire pools are large, sire relatedness may be high, and/or loci numbers or heterozygosity values may be limiting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)220-226
Number of pages7
JournalAnimal genetics
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2004

Fingerprint

parentage
sires
genetic polymorphism
DNA
paternity
Breeding
Genetic Testing
herds
calves
Microsatellite Repeats
beef bulls
breeding
assays
animal production
heterozygosity
testing
microsatellite repeats
loci

Keywords

  • Beef
  • Bull
  • DNA
  • Genetic testing
  • Genetics
  • Microsatellite
  • Parentage
  • Paternity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Impact of candidate sire number and sire relatedness on DNA polymorphism-based measures of exclusion probability and probability of unambiguous parentage. / Sherman, G. B.; Kachman, S. D.; Hungerford, L. L.; Rupp, G. P.; Fox, C. P.; Brown, M. D.; Feuz, B. M.; Holm, T. R.

In: Animal genetics, Vol. 35, No. 3, 01.06.2004, p. 220-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sherman, G. B. ; Kachman, S. D. ; Hungerford, L. L. ; Rupp, G. P. ; Fox, C. P. ; Brown, M. D. ; Feuz, B. M. ; Holm, T. R. / Impact of candidate sire number and sire relatedness on DNA polymorphism-based measures of exclusion probability and probability of unambiguous parentage. In: Animal genetics. 2004 ; Vol. 35, No. 3. pp. 220-226.
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