Impact of addressing reasons for weight loss on behavioral weight-control outcome

Melissa A. Kalarchian, Michele D. Levine, Mary L. Klem, Lora E. Burke, Julia N. Soulakova, Marsha D. Marcus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: One way to improve weight control may be to place greater emphasis on the main reasons why individuals want to lose weight. Purpose: To evaluate the effects of emphasizing physical appearance, health, or both on behavioral weight-control outcome. Design: RCT. Data were collected from 2003 to 2005 and analyzed in 2009. Setting/participants: 203 women aged 18-55 years (M=41.8, SD=9.2) and BMI>27 and <40 (M=34.2, SD=3.7) who rated both appearance and health as important reasons for weight loss, enrolled at a university medical center. Intervention: A 6-month weekly behavioral intervention alone (Standard) was compared to an enhanced focus on physical appearance (Appearance), health benefits of weight loss (Health), or both appearance and health (Combined). The 6-month period of acute intervention was followed by six monthly booster sessions. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome was change in body weight (kg). Additional outcomes included the Multidimensional BodySelf Relations Questionnaire, Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36, and questions about satisfaction with weight, appearance, and health. Assessments were conducted at 0, 6, 12, and 18 months. Results: Appearance demonstrated significantly greater weight loss compared to Standard at 6 months (p=0.0107). Combined demonstrated greater weight loss compared to Standard at 6 and 12 months (p's=0.0034 and 0.0270, respectively). Although addressing motivators differentially affected satisfaction at 6 months, satisfaction was unrelated to weight outcome over the following year. Conclusions: Behavioral interventions incorporating components with a focus on physical appearance were associated with improved short-term weight loss. The mechanism for this effect is unclear and warrants further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-24
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

Fingerprint

Weight Loss
Weights and Measures
Health
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Body Weight Changes
Insurance Benefits
Body Physical Appearance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Kalarchian, M. A., Levine, M. D., Klem, M. L., Burke, L. E., Soulakova, J. N., & Marcus, M. D. (2011). Impact of addressing reasons for weight loss on behavioral weight-control outcome. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 40(1), 18-24. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2010.09.019

Impact of addressing reasons for weight loss on behavioral weight-control outcome. / Kalarchian, Melissa A.; Levine, Michele D.; Klem, Mary L.; Burke, Lora E.; Soulakova, Julia N.; Marcus, Marsha D.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 40, No. 1, 01.01.2011, p. 18-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kalarchian, MA, Levine, MD, Klem, ML, Burke, LE, Soulakova, JN & Marcus, MD 2011, 'Impact of addressing reasons for weight loss on behavioral weight-control outcome', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 18-24. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2010.09.019
Kalarchian, Melissa A. ; Levine, Michele D. ; Klem, Mary L. ; Burke, Lora E. ; Soulakova, Julia N. ; Marcus, Marsha D. / Impact of addressing reasons for weight loss on behavioral weight-control outcome. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 40, No. 1. pp. 18-24.
@article{b3cd5e20aa3d4f02bb635287b217fe1f,
title = "Impact of addressing reasons for weight loss on behavioral weight-control outcome",
abstract = "Background: One way to improve weight control may be to place greater emphasis on the main reasons why individuals want to lose weight. Purpose: To evaluate the effects of emphasizing physical appearance, health, or both on behavioral weight-control outcome. Design: RCT. Data were collected from 2003 to 2005 and analyzed in 2009. Setting/participants: 203 women aged 18-55 years (M=41.8, SD=9.2) and BMI>27 and <40 (M=34.2, SD=3.7) who rated both appearance and health as important reasons for weight loss, enrolled at a university medical center. Intervention: A 6-month weekly behavioral intervention alone (Standard) was compared to an enhanced focus on physical appearance (Appearance), health benefits of weight loss (Health), or both appearance and health (Combined). The 6-month period of acute intervention was followed by six monthly booster sessions. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome was change in body weight (kg). Additional outcomes included the Multidimensional BodySelf Relations Questionnaire, Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36, and questions about satisfaction with weight, appearance, and health. Assessments were conducted at 0, 6, 12, and 18 months. Results: Appearance demonstrated significantly greater weight loss compared to Standard at 6 months (p=0.0107). Combined demonstrated greater weight loss compared to Standard at 6 and 12 months (p's=0.0034 and 0.0270, respectively). Although addressing motivators differentially affected satisfaction at 6 months, satisfaction was unrelated to weight outcome over the following year. Conclusions: Behavioral interventions incorporating components with a focus on physical appearance were associated with improved short-term weight loss. The mechanism for this effect is unclear and warrants further study.",
author = "Kalarchian, {Melissa A.} and Levine, {Michele D.} and Klem, {Mary L.} and Burke, {Lora E.} and Soulakova, {Julia N.} and Marcus, {Marsha D.}",
year = "2011",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.amepre.2010.09.019",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "40",
pages = "18--24",
journal = "American Journal of Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0749-3797",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of addressing reasons for weight loss on behavioral weight-control outcome

AU - Kalarchian, Melissa A.

AU - Levine, Michele D.

AU - Klem, Mary L.

AU - Burke, Lora E.

AU - Soulakova, Julia N.

AU - Marcus, Marsha D.

PY - 2011/1/1

Y1 - 2011/1/1

N2 - Background: One way to improve weight control may be to place greater emphasis on the main reasons why individuals want to lose weight. Purpose: To evaluate the effects of emphasizing physical appearance, health, or both on behavioral weight-control outcome. Design: RCT. Data were collected from 2003 to 2005 and analyzed in 2009. Setting/participants: 203 women aged 18-55 years (M=41.8, SD=9.2) and BMI>27 and <40 (M=34.2, SD=3.7) who rated both appearance and health as important reasons for weight loss, enrolled at a university medical center. Intervention: A 6-month weekly behavioral intervention alone (Standard) was compared to an enhanced focus on physical appearance (Appearance), health benefits of weight loss (Health), or both appearance and health (Combined). The 6-month period of acute intervention was followed by six monthly booster sessions. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome was change in body weight (kg). Additional outcomes included the Multidimensional BodySelf Relations Questionnaire, Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36, and questions about satisfaction with weight, appearance, and health. Assessments were conducted at 0, 6, 12, and 18 months. Results: Appearance demonstrated significantly greater weight loss compared to Standard at 6 months (p=0.0107). Combined demonstrated greater weight loss compared to Standard at 6 and 12 months (p's=0.0034 and 0.0270, respectively). Although addressing motivators differentially affected satisfaction at 6 months, satisfaction was unrelated to weight outcome over the following year. Conclusions: Behavioral interventions incorporating components with a focus on physical appearance were associated with improved short-term weight loss. The mechanism for this effect is unclear and warrants further study.

AB - Background: One way to improve weight control may be to place greater emphasis on the main reasons why individuals want to lose weight. Purpose: To evaluate the effects of emphasizing physical appearance, health, or both on behavioral weight-control outcome. Design: RCT. Data were collected from 2003 to 2005 and analyzed in 2009. Setting/participants: 203 women aged 18-55 years (M=41.8, SD=9.2) and BMI>27 and <40 (M=34.2, SD=3.7) who rated both appearance and health as important reasons for weight loss, enrolled at a university medical center. Intervention: A 6-month weekly behavioral intervention alone (Standard) was compared to an enhanced focus on physical appearance (Appearance), health benefits of weight loss (Health), or both appearance and health (Combined). The 6-month period of acute intervention was followed by six monthly booster sessions. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome was change in body weight (kg). Additional outcomes included the Multidimensional BodySelf Relations Questionnaire, Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36, and questions about satisfaction with weight, appearance, and health. Assessments were conducted at 0, 6, 12, and 18 months. Results: Appearance demonstrated significantly greater weight loss compared to Standard at 6 months (p=0.0107). Combined demonstrated greater weight loss compared to Standard at 6 and 12 months (p's=0.0034 and 0.0270, respectively). Although addressing motivators differentially affected satisfaction at 6 months, satisfaction was unrelated to weight outcome over the following year. Conclusions: Behavioral interventions incorporating components with a focus on physical appearance were associated with improved short-term weight loss. The mechanism for this effect is unclear and warrants further study.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78650154199&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78650154199&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.amepre.2010.09.019

DO - 10.1016/j.amepre.2010.09.019

M3 - Article

C2 - 21146763

AN - SCOPUS:78650154199

VL - 40

SP - 18

EP - 24

JO - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

JF - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

SN - 0749-3797

IS - 1

ER -