Identifying Safety Hazards Using Collective Bodily Responses of Workers

Hyunsoo Kim, Changbum R. Ahn, Kanghyeok Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Current construction hazard identification mostly relies on safety managers' ability to identify hazards using their prior knowledge about them. Consequently, numerous latent hazards remain unidentified, which poses significant risks to construction workers. To advance current hazard identification capabilities, this study examines the feasibility of harnessing and analyzing collective patterns of workers' bodily responses (balance, gait, etc.) to identify safety hazards on a jobsite. To test the hypothesis that the abnormality of workers' bodily responses in one location highly correlates with the likelihood of a safety hazard in that location, this project collected data on the bodily responses of 10 subjects who participated in five experiments. These test subjects wore inertial measurement unit (IMU) sensors on their body. Then the collected response data were analyzed using three metrics [average, standard deviation, and Shapiro-Wilk statistic (W)]. The data showed that the normality of workers' bodily response distributions - represented as a W statistic - highly correlated with hazard locations in every experiment, which implies that workers' bodily responses in hazardous areas are more irregularly distributed than in nonhazardous areas. This outcome demonstrates an opportunity for utilizing workers' collective bodily responses to identify safety hazards in diverse construction environments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number04016090
JournalJournal of Construction Engineering and Management
Volume143
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

Fingerprint

Hazards
Statistics
Units of measurement
Hazard
Safety
Workers
Managers
Experiments
Wear of materials
Sensors

Keywords

  • Bodily response
  • Collective sensing
  • Hazard identification
  • Inertial measurement unit (IMU)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction
  • Industrial relations
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

Identifying Safety Hazards Using Collective Bodily Responses of Workers. / Kim, Hyunsoo; Ahn, Changbum R.; Yang, Kanghyeok.

In: Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, Vol. 143, No. 2, 04016090, 01.02.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, Hyunsoo ; Ahn, Changbum R. ; Yang, Kanghyeok. / Identifying Safety Hazards Using Collective Bodily Responses of Workers. In: Journal of Construction Engineering and Management. 2017 ; Vol. 143, No. 2.
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