Identifying Anxiety Through Tracked Head Movements in a Virtual Classroom

Andrea Stevenson Won, Brian Perone, Michelle Friend, Jeremy N. Bailenson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Virtual reality allows the controlled simulation of complex social settings, such as classrooms, and thus provides an opportunity to test a range of theories in the social sciences in a way that is both naturalistic and controlled. Importantly, virtual environments also allow the body movements of participants in the virtual world to be tracked and recorded. In the following article, we discuss how tracked head movements were correlated with participants' reports of anxiety in a simulation of a classroom. Participants who reported a high sense of awareness of and concern about the other virtual people in the room showed different patterns of head movement (more lateral head movement, indicating scanning behavior) from those who reported a low level of concern. We discuss the implications of this research for understanding nonverbal behavior associated with anxiety and for the design of online educational systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)380-387
Number of pages8
JournalCyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking
Volume19
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Head Movements
Virtual reality
Anxiety
anxiety
classroom
Social sciences
Online Systems
simulation
Social Sciences
Scanning
virtual reality
educational system
social science
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Communication
  • Applied Psychology
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Identifying Anxiety Through Tracked Head Movements in a Virtual Classroom. / Won, Andrea Stevenson; Perone, Brian; Friend, Michelle; Bailenson, Jeremy N.

In: Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, Vol. 19, No. 6, 01.06.2016, p. 380-387.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Won, Andrea Stevenson ; Perone, Brian ; Friend, Michelle ; Bailenson, Jeremy N. / Identifying Anxiety Through Tracked Head Movements in a Virtual Classroom. In: Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking. 2016 ; Vol. 19, No. 6. pp. 380-387.
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