Identification of populations at risk: Stillbirth toolkit for health care providers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Maternity care and women's health are measured, in part, by the stillbirth rate of a country. The purposes of this pilot project were to: a) establish a baseline of health care provider knowledge regarding stillbirth risk factors based on geographic distribution (urban/rural) and provider licensure (MD, APRN, PA, CNM) and b) evaluate the utility of a Stillbirth Risk Factor Toolkit and its effects on provider knowledge. Methods: Evaluative research using a retrospective pre-posttest survey design was completed. The study setting included primary care clinics (urban [n = 25] and rural [n = 25]) in Nebraska. Health care providers from N = 50 clinics were surveyed about their knowledge of stillbirth risk factors (modifiable and non-modifiable) before and after reading the Toolkit. Results: Providers were least knowledgeable regarding the definition of stillbirth and the number of weeks' gestation that constitute a stillbirth. Overall, there was no significant difference in baseline knowledge between rural and urban providers. Nearly half (43.8%) found the Toolkit to be very helpful and applicable to their patient population, and 34.8% said they would be very likely to utilize it with their patients. There was a statistically significant increase in knowledge of stillbirth risk factors among all health care providers after reviewing the Toolkit (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Health providers had varied baseline knowledge about stillbirth. The Toolkit improved provider knowledge, but further research is needed to assess its impact on clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)249-251
Number of pages3
JournalApplied Nursing Research
Volume39
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2018

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Stillbirth
Health Personnel
Women's Health
Licensure
Research
Reading
Primary Health Care
Pregnancy
Health

Keywords

  • Populations
  • Risk
  • Stillbirth
  • Toolkit

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Identification of populations at risk : Stillbirth toolkit for health care providers. / Ford, Amy L.; Cramer, Mary E; Struwe, Leeza A.

In: Applied Nursing Research, Vol. 39, 02.2018, p. 249-251.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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