Identification of IgE-binding proteins in soy lecithin

Xuelin Gu, Tom Beardslee, Michael Zeece, Gautam Sarath, John Markwell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Soy lecithin is widely used as an emulsifier in processed foods, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. Soy lecithin is composed principally of phospholipids; however, it has also been shown to contain IgE-binding proteins, albeit at a low level. A few clinical cases involving allergic reactions to soy lecithin have been reported. The purpose of this investigation is to better characterize the IgE-binding proteins typically found in lecithin. Methods: Soy lecithin proteins were isolated following solvent extraction of lipid components and then separated on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The separated lecithin proteins were immunoblotted with sera from soy-sensitive individuals to determine the pattern of IgE-binding proteins. The identity of IgE-reactive bands was determined from their N-terminal sequence. Results: The level of protein in six lecithin samples obtained from commercial suppliers ranged from 100 to 1,400 ppm. Lecithin samples showed similar protein patterns when examined by SDS-PAGE. Immunoblotting with sera from soy-sensitive individuals showed IgE binding to bands corresponding to 7, 12, 20, 39 and 57 kD. N-terminal analysis of these IgE-binding bands resulted in sequences for 3 components. The 12-kD band was identified as a methionine-rich protein (MRP) and a member of the 2S albumin class of soy proteins. The 20-kD band was found to be soybean Kunitz trypsin inhibitor. The 39-kD band was matched to a soy protein with unknown function. Conclusions: Soy lecithin contains a number of IgE-binding proteins; thus, it might represent a source of hidden allergens. These allergens are a more significant concern for soy-allergic individuals consuming lecithin products as a health supplement. In addition, the MRP and the 39-kD protein identified in this study represent newly identified IgE-binding proteins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)218-225
Number of pages8
JournalInternational archives of allergy and immunology
Volume126
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001

Fingerprint

Galectin 3
Lecithins
Soybean Proteins
Immunoglobulin E
Proteins
Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate
Methionine
Allergens
Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis
Kunitz Soybean Trypsin Inhibitor
Serum
Immunoblotting
Cosmetics
Albumins
Phospholipids
Hypersensitivity

Keywords

  • 2S soybean albumin
  • Food allergens
  • IgE-binding proteins
  • Lecithin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Gu, X., Beardslee, T., Zeece, M., Sarath, G., & Markwell, J. (2001). Identification of IgE-binding proteins in soy lecithin. International archives of allergy and immunology, 126(3), 218-225. https://doi.org/10.1159/000049517

Identification of IgE-binding proteins in soy lecithin. / Gu, Xuelin; Beardslee, Tom; Zeece, Michael; Sarath, Gautam; Markwell, John.

In: International archives of allergy and immunology, Vol. 126, No. 3, 01.12.2001, p. 218-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gu, X, Beardslee, T, Zeece, M, Sarath, G & Markwell, J 2001, 'Identification of IgE-binding proteins in soy lecithin', International archives of allergy and immunology, vol. 126, no. 3, pp. 218-225. https://doi.org/10.1159/000049517
Gu, Xuelin ; Beardslee, Tom ; Zeece, Michael ; Sarath, Gautam ; Markwell, John. / Identification of IgE-binding proteins in soy lecithin. In: International archives of allergy and immunology. 2001 ; Vol. 126, No. 3. pp. 218-225.
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