Identification and assessment of markers of biotin status in healthy adults

Wei Kay Eng, David Giraud, Vicki L Schlegel, Dong Wang, Bo Hyun Lee, Janos Zempleni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human biotin requirements are unknown and the identification of reliable markers of biotin status is necessary to fill this knowledge gap. Here, we used an outpatient feeding protocol to create states of biotin deficiency, sufficiency and supplementation in sixteen healthy men and women. A total of twenty possible markers of biotin status were assessed, including the abundance of biotinylated carboxylases in lymphocytes, the expression of genes from biotin metabolism and the urinary excretion of biotin and organic acids. Only the abundance of biotinylated 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (holo-MCC) and propionyl-CoA carboxylase (holo-PCC) allowed for distinguishing biotin-deficient and biotin-sufficient individuals. The urinary excretion of biotin reliably identified biotin-supplemented subjects, but did not distinguish between biotin-depleted and biotin-sufficient individuals. The urinary excretion of 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid detected some biotin-deficient subjects, but produced a meaningful number of false-negative results and did not distinguish between biotin-sufficient and biotin-supplemented individuals. None of the other organic acids that were tested were useful markers of biotin status. Likewise, the abundance of mRNA coding for biotin transporters, holocarboxylase synthetase and biotin-dependent carboxylases in lymphocytes were not different among the treatment groups. Generally, datasets were characterised by variations that exceeded those seen in studies in cell cultures. We conclude that holo-MCC and holo-PCC are the most reliable, single markers of biotin status tested in the present study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)321-329
Number of pages9
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
Volume110
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 28 2013

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Biotin
Methylmalonyl-CoA Decarboxylase
biotin carboxylase
methylcrotonoyl-CoA carboxylase
Lymphocytes
Acids

Keywords

  • Biotin status assessment
  • Carboxylases
  • Gene expression
  • Organic acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Identification and assessment of markers of biotin status in healthy adults. / Eng, Wei Kay; Giraud, David; Schlegel, Vicki L; Wang, Dong; Lee, Bo Hyun; Zempleni, Janos.

In: British Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 110, No. 2, 28.07.2013, p. 321-329.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eng, Wei Kay ; Giraud, David ; Schlegel, Vicki L ; Wang, Dong ; Lee, Bo Hyun ; Zempleni, Janos. / Identification and assessment of markers of biotin status in healthy adults. In: British Journal of Nutrition. 2013 ; Vol. 110, No. 2. pp. 321-329.
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