Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Trends, Barriers, and Promotion Methods Among American Indian/Alaska Native and Non-Hispanic White Adolescents in Michigan 2006–2015

Beeta M. Kashani, Melissa K Tibbits, Rachel C. Potter, Rosa Gofin, Li Westman, Shinobu Watanabe-Galloway

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, the most common sexually transmitted disease in the US, is a preventable cause of cancer. HPV vaccination has the potential to prevent 90% of HPV-related cancer cases but is underutilized, especially among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) adolescents. The objectives of this study were to (1) describe trends and identify predictors of HPV vaccination initiation and completion in Michigan’s AI and Non-Hispanic White children age 9 through 18 years and (2) to identify barriers to HPV vaccination and promotion methods at the tribal, state, and local levels in Michigan. Data from Michigan’s immunization information system from 2006 to 2015 were used for analysis. Additionally, semi-structured interviews were conducted with public health professionals across the state to identify barriers to and promoters of HPV vaccination. Predictors for vaccine initiation included being female, AI/AN, and living in high poverty zip code. Predictors of vaccine completion were female gender and younger age at vaccine initiation. Barriers to vaccination included misinformation and weak or inconsistent provider recommendations. Strategies used by health professionals to promote HPV vaccination included immunization summaries, vaccine information statements, the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program, and provider training. Findings suggested the need for education of parents to demystify HPV vaccine benefits and risks and provider training for more consistent recommendations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Community Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

North American Indians
American Indian
vaccination
Vaccination
promotion
adolescent
Vaccines
trend
health professionals
cancer
Immunization
children's program
sexually transmitted disease
Education
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Immunization Programs
artificial intelligence
Papillomavirus Infections
Poverty
Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Keywords

  • American Indian
  • Cervical cancer
  • HPV vaccine
  • Human papillomavirus
  • Michigan
  • Vaccine promotion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Trends, Barriers, and Promotion Methods Among American Indian/Alaska Native and Non-Hispanic White Adolescents in Michigan 2006–2015",
abstract = "Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, the most common sexually transmitted disease in the US, is a preventable cause of cancer. HPV vaccination has the potential to prevent 90{\%} of HPV-related cancer cases but is underutilized, especially among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) adolescents. The objectives of this study were to (1) describe trends and identify predictors of HPV vaccination initiation and completion in Michigan’s AI and Non-Hispanic White children age 9 through 18 years and (2) to identify barriers to HPV vaccination and promotion methods at the tribal, state, and local levels in Michigan. Data from Michigan’s immunization information system from 2006 to 2015 were used for analysis. Additionally, semi-structured interviews were conducted with public health professionals across the state to identify barriers to and promoters of HPV vaccination. Predictors for vaccine initiation included being female, AI/AN, and living in high poverty zip code. Predictors of vaccine completion were female gender and younger age at vaccine initiation. Barriers to vaccination included misinformation and weak or inconsistent provider recommendations. Strategies used by health professionals to promote HPV vaccination included immunization summaries, vaccine information statements, the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program, and provider training. Findings suggested the need for education of parents to demystify HPV vaccine benefits and risks and provider training for more consistent recommendations.",
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AU - Tibbits, Melissa K

AU - Potter, Rachel C.

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AU - Westman, Li

AU - Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu

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