Human papillomavirus seroprevalence among men entering military service and seroincidence after ten years of service.

Brian K. Agan, Grace E. Macalino, Hala Nsouli-Maktabi, Xun Wang, Joel C. Gaydos, Anuradha Ganesan, Mark G Kortepeter, Jose L. Sanchez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) is recommended to prevent cervical cancer among women. Vaccinating men against human papillomavirus (HPV) can prevent penile, anal, and oral cancers, anogenital warts, and the transmission of HPV to their sexual partners. This study characterized HPV acquisition among male military members by evaluating both seroprevalence at entry into service and seroincidence of HPV infection after ten years of service. At entry, 29 of 200 (14.5%) male service members were positive for HPV serotypes 6, 11, 16, or 18. Of 199 initially seronegative for at least one of the four HPV serotypes, 68 (34.2%) seroconverted to one or more serotypes at ten years; more than one-third of these were seropositive for oncogenic HPV serotypes. This estimate of HPV seroprevalence among male military accessions is higher than that reported among U.S. civilian males. Vaccination to prevent genital warts and cancers resulting from HPV infection may decrease health care system burdens. Further analyses are warranted to understand the potential costs and benefits of a policy to vaccinate male service members.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-24
Number of pages4
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume20
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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Seroepidemiologic Studies
Papillomavirus Infections
Vaccination
Penile Neoplasms
Anus Neoplasms
Human papillomavirus 6
Condylomata Acuminata
Warts
Sexual Partners
Mouth Neoplasms
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Delivery of Health Care
Serogroup

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Agan, B. K., Macalino, G. E., Nsouli-Maktabi, H., Wang, X., Gaydos, J. C., Ganesan, A., ... Sanchez, J. L. (2013). Human papillomavirus seroprevalence among men entering military service and seroincidence after ten years of service. Unknown Journal, 20(2), 21-24.

Human papillomavirus seroprevalence among men entering military service and seroincidence after ten years of service. / Agan, Brian K.; Macalino, Grace E.; Nsouli-Maktabi, Hala; Wang, Xun; Gaydos, Joel C.; Ganesan, Anuradha; Kortepeter, Mark G; Sanchez, Jose L.

In: Unknown Journal, Vol. 20, No. 2, 01.01.2013, p. 21-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Agan, BK, Macalino, GE, Nsouli-Maktabi, H, Wang, X, Gaydos, JC, Ganesan, A, Kortepeter, MG & Sanchez, JL 2013, 'Human papillomavirus seroprevalence among men entering military service and seroincidence after ten years of service.', Unknown Journal, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 21-24.
Agan BK, Macalino GE, Nsouli-Maktabi H, Wang X, Gaydos JC, Ganesan A et al. Human papillomavirus seroprevalence among men entering military service and seroincidence after ten years of service. Unknown Journal. 2013 Jan 1;20(2):21-24.
Agan, Brian K. ; Macalino, Grace E. ; Nsouli-Maktabi, Hala ; Wang, Xun ; Gaydos, Joel C. ; Ganesan, Anuradha ; Kortepeter, Mark G ; Sanchez, Jose L. / Human papillomavirus seroprevalence among men entering military service and seroincidence after ten years of service. In: Unknown Journal. 2013 ; Vol. 20, No. 2. pp. 21-24.
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