Human mrna response to exercise and temperature

D. R. Slivka, C. L. Dumke, T. J. Tucker, J. S. Cuddy, B. Ruby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to determine the mRNA response to exercise in different environmental temperatures. 9 recreationally active males (271 years, 77.42.7kg, 13.51.5% fat, 4.490.15Lmin 1 VO 2 max) completed 3 trials consisting of 1h cycling exercise at 60% W max followed by a 3h recovery in the cold (7C), room temperature (20C), and hot (33C) environments. Muscle biopsies were obtained pre, post, and 3h post exercise for the analysis of glycogen and mRNA. Expired gases were collected to calculate substrate use. PGC-1 increased to a greater degree in the cold trial than in the room temperature trial (p=0.036) and the hot trial (p=0.006). PGC1- mRNA was also higher after the room temperature trial than the hot trial (p=0.050). UCP3 and MFN2 mRNA increased with exercise (p<0.05), but were unaffected by temperature. COX was unaffected by exercise or temperature. Muscle glycogen decreased with exercise (p<0.05), but was no different among trials. Whole body VO 2 was lower during exercise in the cold than exercise in the heat. However, VO 2 was higher during recovery in the cold trial than in the room temperature and hot trials (p<0.05). This study presents evidence of PGC-1 temperature sensitivity in human skeletal muscle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)94-100
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

Hot Temperature
Temperature
Messenger RNA
Glycogen
Muscles
Skeletal Muscle
Gases
Fats
Biopsy
Research

Keywords

  • COX
  • MFN2
  • PGC1
  • UCP3
  • cold
  • hot

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Human mrna response to exercise and temperature. / Slivka, D. R.; Dumke, C. L.; Tucker, T. J.; Cuddy, J. S.; Ruby, B.

In: International Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 33, No. 2, 01.01.2012, p. 94-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Slivka, D. R. ; Dumke, C. L. ; Tucker, T. J. ; Cuddy, J. S. ; Ruby, B. / Human mrna response to exercise and temperature. In: International Journal of Sports Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 33, No. 2. pp. 94-100.
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