How noise and language proficiency influence speech recognition by individual non-native listeners

Jin Zhang, Lingli Xie, Yongjun Li, Monita Chatterjee, Nai Ding

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated how speech recognition in noise is affected by language proficiency for individual non-native speakers. The recognition of English and Chinese sentences was measured as a function of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in sixty native Chinese speakers who never lived in an English-speaking environment. The recognition score for speech in quiet (which varied from 15%-92%) was found to be uncorrelated with speech recognition threshold (SRTQ/2), i.e. the SNR at which the recognition score drops to 50% of the recognition score in quiet. This result demonstrates separable contributions of language proficiency and auditory processing to speech recognition in noise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere113386
JournalPloS one
Volume9
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 19 2014

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Speech recognition
Acoustic noise
Noise
Language
Signal to noise ratio
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Processing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

Cite this

How noise and language proficiency influence speech recognition by individual non-native listeners. / Zhang, Jin; Xie, Lingli; Li, Yongjun; Chatterjee, Monita; Ding, Nai.

In: PloS one, Vol. 9, No. 11, e113386, 19.11.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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