Horner's syndrome after coronary artery bypass surgery

D. Barbut, J. P. Gold, M. H. Heinemann, R. B. Hinton, R. R. Trifiletti

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Abstract

We established the frequency of Horner's syndrome (HS) in 248 elective patients after coronary artery bypass surgery. Patients were evaluated neurologically pre- and post-operatively and 6 months after surgery. Nineteen patients (7.7%) developed unilateral HS postoperatively, 12 involving the left eye. The finding persisted in 10 patients (4%) at 6 months. When assessed 2 to 6 days, or 6 months, postoperatively, HS tended to be isolated and not associated with C8/T1 plexopathy. Among nondiabetic subjects, hypertensive patients had a higher frequency of HS than normotensive patients (10.6% versus 2.9%, p = 0.05). Among normotensive subjects, diabetic patients had a higher frequency than nondiabetic patients (15% versus 2.9%, p = 0.08). There was no association between HS, age, sex, internal mammary artery grafting, or length of cardiopulmonary bypass time. In summary, HS is a common and sometimes persistent complication of coronary artery bypass surgery. Hypertensive, and possibly diabetic, patients appear to be at greatest risk for developing HS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-184
Number of pages4
JournalNeurology
Volume46
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1996

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Horner Syndrome
Coronary Artery Bypass
Mammary Arteries
Cardiopulmonary Bypass

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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Barbut, D., Gold, J. P., Heinemann, M. H., Hinton, R. B., & Trifiletti, R. R. (1996). Horner's syndrome after coronary artery bypass surgery. Neurology, 46(1), 181-184. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.46.1.181

Horner's syndrome after coronary artery bypass surgery. / Barbut, D.; Gold, J. P.; Heinemann, M. H.; Hinton, R. B.; Trifiletti, R. R.

In: Neurology, Vol. 46, No. 1, 01.1996, p. 181-184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barbut, D, Gold, JP, Heinemann, MH, Hinton, RB & Trifiletti, RR 1996, 'Horner's syndrome after coronary artery bypass surgery', Neurology, vol. 46, no. 1, pp. 181-184. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.46.1.181
Barbut D, Gold JP, Heinemann MH, Hinton RB, Trifiletti RR. Horner's syndrome after coronary artery bypass surgery. Neurology. 1996 Jan;46(1):181-184. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.46.1.181
Barbut, D. ; Gold, J. P. ; Heinemann, M. H. ; Hinton, R. B. ; Trifiletti, R. R. / Horner's syndrome after coronary artery bypass surgery. In: Neurology. 1996 ; Vol. 46, No. 1. pp. 181-184.
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