Homework

A Comparison of Teachers’ and Parents’ Perceptions of the Problems Experienced by Students Identified as Having Behavioral Disorders, Learning Disabilities, or Mo Disabilities

Michael H Epstein, Edward A. Polloway, Regina M. Foley, James R. Patton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With the significant attention given to the American educational system by national commissions and reports in the 1980s, a variety of practices have come under review. One such practice is the role of homework in the curriculum. Findings that American students at the secondary level generally spend less than 1 hour per day on homework, combined with empirical data suggestive of the positive effects of homework in achievement, have given rise to increased commitment to the assignment of homework. However, scant attention has been given to the effect of this trend on students with disabilities. The purpose of this study was to determine the homework problems experienced by students identified as having either learning disabilities or behavioral disorders as compared to an age-matched sample of students in general education. An analysis of data from both teacher and parent ratings on the Homework Problem Checklist indicated that more significant problems were found for both of the groups of students with disabilities. Post hoc analyses revealed that the students with behavioral disorders had the most pronounced difficulties. The discussion focuses at length on the implications of these findings for educational interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)40-50
Number of pages11
JournalRemedial and Special Education
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

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Learning Disorders
homework
learning disability
parents
Parents
disability
Students
teacher
student
general education
Checklist
educational system
Curriculum
rating
commitment
Education
curriculum
trend
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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Homework : A Comparison of Teachers’ and Parents’ Perceptions of the Problems Experienced by Students Identified as Having Behavioral Disorders, Learning Disabilities, or Mo Disabilities. / Epstein, Michael H; Polloway, Edward A.; Foley, Regina M.; Patton, James R.

In: Remedial and Special Education, Vol. 14, No. 5, 01.01.1993, p. 40-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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