Highly activated CD8+ T cells in the brain correlate with early central nervous system dysfunction in simian immunodeficiency virus infection

M. C.G. Marcondes, E. M.E. Burudi, S. Huitron-Resendiz, M. Sanchez-Alavez, D. Watry, M. Zandonatti, S. J. Henriksen, H. S. Fox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

One of the consequences of HIV infection is damage to the CNS. To characterize the virologic, immunologic, and functional factors involved in HIV-induced CNS disease, we analyzed the viral loads and T cell infiltrates in the brains of SIV-infected rbesus monkeys whose CNS function (sensory evoked potential) was impaired. Following infection, CNS evoked potentials were abnormal, indicating early CNS disease. Upon autopsy at 11 wk post-SIV inoculation, tbe brains of infected animals contained over 5-fold more CD8+ T cells than did uninfected controls. In both infected and uninfected groups, these CD8+ T cells presented distinct levels of activation markers (CD11a and CD95) at different sites: brain > CSF > spleen = blood > lymph nodes. The CD8+ cells obtained from the brains of infected monkeys expressed mRNA for cytolytic and proinflammatory molecules, such as granzymes A and B, perforin, and IFN-γ. Therefore, the neurological dysfunctions correlated with increased numbers of CD8+ T cells of an activated phenotype in the brain, suggesting that virus-host interactions contributed to the related CNS functional defects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5429-5438
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume167
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2001

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Simian Immunodeficiency Virus
Virus Diseases
Central Nervous System
T-Lymphocytes
Brain
Granzymes
Central Nervous System Diseases
Evoked Potentials
Haplorhini
Perforin
Immunologic Factors
Viral Load
HIV Infections
Autopsy
Spleen
Lymph Nodes
HIV
Viruses
Phenotype
Messenger RNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Highly activated CD8+ T cells in the brain correlate with early central nervous system dysfunction in simian immunodeficiency virus infection. / Marcondes, M. C.G.; Burudi, E. M.E.; Huitron-Resendiz, S.; Sanchez-Alavez, M.; Watry, D.; Zandonatti, M.; Henriksen, S. J.; Fox, H. S.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 167, No. 9, 01.11.2001, p. 5429-5438.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marcondes, MCG, Burudi, EME, Huitron-Resendiz, S, Sanchez-Alavez, M, Watry, D, Zandonatti, M, Henriksen, SJ & Fox, HS 2001, 'Highly activated CD8+ T cells in the brain correlate with early central nervous system dysfunction in simian immunodeficiency virus infection', Journal of Immunology, vol. 167, no. 9, pp. 5429-5438. https://doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.167.9.5429
Marcondes, M. C.G. ; Burudi, E. M.E. ; Huitron-Resendiz, S. ; Sanchez-Alavez, M. ; Watry, D. ; Zandonatti, M. ; Henriksen, S. J. ; Fox, H. S. / Highly activated CD8+ T cells in the brain correlate with early central nervous system dysfunction in simian immunodeficiency virus infection. In: Journal of Immunology. 2001 ; Vol. 167, No. 9. pp. 5429-5438.
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