High-resolution imaging of selenium in kidneys: A localized selenium pool associated with glutathione peroxidase 3

Mikalai Malinouski, Sebastian Kehr, Lydia Finney, Stefan Vogt, Bradley A. Carlson, Javier Seravalli, Richard Jin, Diane E. Handy, Thomas J. Park, Joseph Loscalzo, Dolph L. Hatfield, Vadim N. Gladyshev

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: Recent advances in quantitative methods and sensitive imaging techniques of trace elements provide opportunities to uncover and explain their biological roles. In particular, the distribution of selenium in tissues and cells under both physiological and pathological conditions remains unknown. In this work, we applied high-resolution synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to map selenium distribution in mouse liver and kidney. Results: Liver showed a uniform selenium distribution that was dependent on selenocysteine tRNA [Ser]Sec and dietary selenium. In contrast, kidney selenium had both uniformly distributed and highly localized components, the latter visualized as thin circular structures surrounding proximal tubules. Other parts of the kidney, such as glomeruli and distal tubules, only manifested the uniformly distributed selenium pattern that co-localized with sulfur. We found that proximal tubule selenium localized to the basement membrane. It was preserved in Selenoprotein P knockout mice, but was completely eliminated in glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3) knockout mice, indicating that this selenium represented GPx3. We further imaged kidneys of another model organism, the naked mole rat, which showed a diminished uniformly distributed selenium pool, but preserved the circular proximal tubule signal. Innovation: We applied XFM to image selenium in mammalian tissues and identified a highly localized pool of this trace element at the basement membrane of kidneys that was associated with GPx3. Conclusion: XFM allowed us to define and explain the tissue topography of selenium in mammalian kidneys at submicron resolution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)185-192
Number of pages8
JournalAntioxidants and Redox Signaling
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2012

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Selenium
Glutathione Peroxidase
Kidney
Imaging techniques
Fluorescence microscopy
Fluorescence Microscopy
X-Rays
Trace Elements
Tissue
Basement Membrane
Knockout Mice
X rays
Liver
Selenoprotein P
Mole Rats
Synchrotrons
Sulfur
Topography
Rats
Innovation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Physiology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

High-resolution imaging of selenium in kidneys : A localized selenium pool associated with glutathione peroxidase 3. / Malinouski, Mikalai; Kehr, Sebastian; Finney, Lydia; Vogt, Stefan; Carlson, Bradley A.; Seravalli, Javier; Jin, Richard; Handy, Diane E.; Park, Thomas J.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

In: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, Vol. 16, No. 3, 01.02.2012, p. 185-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Malinouski, M, Kehr, S, Finney, L, Vogt, S, Carlson, BA, Seravalli, J, Jin, R, Handy, DE, Park, TJ, Loscalzo, J, Hatfield, DL & Gladyshev, VN 2012, 'High-resolution imaging of selenium in kidneys: A localized selenium pool associated with glutathione peroxidase 3', Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 185-192. https://doi.org/10.1089/ars.2011.3997
Malinouski, Mikalai ; Kehr, Sebastian ; Finney, Lydia ; Vogt, Stefan ; Carlson, Bradley A. ; Seravalli, Javier ; Jin, Richard ; Handy, Diane E. ; Park, Thomas J. ; Loscalzo, Joseph ; Hatfield, Dolph L. ; Gladyshev, Vadim N. / High-resolution imaging of selenium in kidneys : A localized selenium pool associated with glutathione peroxidase 3. In: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling. 2012 ; Vol. 16, No. 3. pp. 185-192.
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