High muscle co-contraction does not result in high joint forces during gait in anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees

Ashutosh Khandha, Kurt Manal, Jacob Capin, Elizabeth A Wellsandt, Adam Marmon, Lynn Snyder-Mackler, Thomas S. Buchanan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The mechanism of knee osteoarthritis development after anterior cruciate ligament injuries is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate knee gait variables, muscle co-contraction indices and knee joint loading in young subjects with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency (ACLD, n = 36), versus control subjects (n = 12). A validated, electromyography-informed model was used to estimate joint loading. For the involved limb of ACLD subjects versus control, muscle co-contraction indices were higher for the medial (p = 0.018, effect size = 0.93) and lateral (p = 0.028, effect size = 0.83) agonist–antagonist muscle pairs. Despite higher muscle co-contraction, medial compartment contact force was lower for the involved limb, compared to both the uninvolved limb (mean difference = 0.39 body weight, p = 0.009, effect size = 0.70) as well as the control limb (mean difference = 0.57 body weight, p = 0.007, effect size = 1.14). Similar observations were made for total contact force. For involved versus uninvolved limb, the ACLD group demonstrated lower vertical ground reaction force (mean difference = 0.08 body weight, p = 0.010, effect size = 0.70) and knee flexion moment (mean difference = 1.32% body weight * height, p = 0.003, effect size = 0.76), during weight acceptance. These results indicate that high muscle co-contraction does not always result in high knee joint loading, which is thought to be associated with knee osteoarthritis. Long-term follow-up is required to evaluate how gait alterations progress in non-osteoarthritic versus osteoarthritic subjects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-112
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic Research
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Anterior Cruciate Ligament
Muscle Contraction
Gait
Knee
Extremities
Body Weight
Knee Osteoarthritis
Knee Joint
Body Height
Electromyography
Lower Extremity
Joints
Weights and Measures
Muscles

Keywords

  • ACL
  • joint forces
  • knee
  • muscle co-contraction
  • musculoskeletal modeling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

High muscle co-contraction does not result in high joint forces during gait in anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees. / Khandha, Ashutosh; Manal, Kurt; Capin, Jacob; Wellsandt, Elizabeth A; Marmon, Adam; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Buchanan, Thomas S.

In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research, Vol. 37, No. 1, 01.2019, p. 104-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Khandha, Ashutosh ; Manal, Kurt ; Capin, Jacob ; Wellsandt, Elizabeth A ; Marmon, Adam ; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn ; Buchanan, Thomas S. / High muscle co-contraction does not result in high joint forces during gait in anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees. In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research. 2019 ; Vol. 37, No. 1. pp. 104-112.
@article{3d8f9aca52224697a6233cb9100fb90e,
title = "High muscle co-contraction does not result in high joint forces during gait in anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees",
abstract = "The mechanism of knee osteoarthritis development after anterior cruciate ligament injuries is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate knee gait variables, muscle co-contraction indices and knee joint loading in young subjects with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency (ACLD, n = 36), versus control subjects (n = 12). A validated, electromyography-informed model was used to estimate joint loading. For the involved limb of ACLD subjects versus control, muscle co-contraction indices were higher for the medial (p = 0.018, effect size = 0.93) and lateral (p = 0.028, effect size = 0.83) agonist–antagonist muscle pairs. Despite higher muscle co-contraction, medial compartment contact force was lower for the involved limb, compared to both the uninvolved limb (mean difference = 0.39 body weight, p = 0.009, effect size = 0.70) as well as the control limb (mean difference = 0.57 body weight, p = 0.007, effect size = 1.14). Similar observations were made for total contact force. For involved versus uninvolved limb, the ACLD group demonstrated lower vertical ground reaction force (mean difference = 0.08 body weight, p = 0.010, effect size = 0.70) and knee flexion moment (mean difference = 1.32{\%} body weight * height, p = 0.003, effect size = 0.76), during weight acceptance. These results indicate that high muscle co-contraction does not always result in high knee joint loading, which is thought to be associated with knee osteoarthritis. Long-term follow-up is required to evaluate how gait alterations progress in non-osteoarthritic versus osteoarthritic subjects.",
keywords = "ACL, joint forces, knee, muscle co-contraction, musculoskeletal modeling",
author = "Ashutosh Khandha and Kurt Manal and Jacob Capin and Wellsandt, {Elizabeth A} and Adam Marmon and Lynn Snyder-Mackler and Buchanan, {Thomas S.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1002/jor.24141",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "104--112",
journal = "Journal of Orthopaedic Research",
issn = "0736-0266",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - High muscle co-contraction does not result in high joint forces during gait in anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees

AU - Khandha, Ashutosh

AU - Manal, Kurt

AU - Capin, Jacob

AU - Wellsandt, Elizabeth A

AU - Marmon, Adam

AU - Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

AU - Buchanan, Thomas S.

PY - 2019/1

Y1 - 2019/1

N2 - The mechanism of knee osteoarthritis development after anterior cruciate ligament injuries is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate knee gait variables, muscle co-contraction indices and knee joint loading in young subjects with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency (ACLD, n = 36), versus control subjects (n = 12). A validated, electromyography-informed model was used to estimate joint loading. For the involved limb of ACLD subjects versus control, muscle co-contraction indices were higher for the medial (p = 0.018, effect size = 0.93) and lateral (p = 0.028, effect size = 0.83) agonist–antagonist muscle pairs. Despite higher muscle co-contraction, medial compartment contact force was lower for the involved limb, compared to both the uninvolved limb (mean difference = 0.39 body weight, p = 0.009, effect size = 0.70) as well as the control limb (mean difference = 0.57 body weight, p = 0.007, effect size = 1.14). Similar observations were made for total contact force. For involved versus uninvolved limb, the ACLD group demonstrated lower vertical ground reaction force (mean difference = 0.08 body weight, p = 0.010, effect size = 0.70) and knee flexion moment (mean difference = 1.32% body weight * height, p = 0.003, effect size = 0.76), during weight acceptance. These results indicate that high muscle co-contraction does not always result in high knee joint loading, which is thought to be associated with knee osteoarthritis. Long-term follow-up is required to evaluate how gait alterations progress in non-osteoarthritic versus osteoarthritic subjects.

AB - The mechanism of knee osteoarthritis development after anterior cruciate ligament injuries is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate knee gait variables, muscle co-contraction indices and knee joint loading in young subjects with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency (ACLD, n = 36), versus control subjects (n = 12). A validated, electromyography-informed model was used to estimate joint loading. For the involved limb of ACLD subjects versus control, muscle co-contraction indices were higher for the medial (p = 0.018, effect size = 0.93) and lateral (p = 0.028, effect size = 0.83) agonist–antagonist muscle pairs. Despite higher muscle co-contraction, medial compartment contact force was lower for the involved limb, compared to both the uninvolved limb (mean difference = 0.39 body weight, p = 0.009, effect size = 0.70) as well as the control limb (mean difference = 0.57 body weight, p = 0.007, effect size = 1.14). Similar observations were made for total contact force. For involved versus uninvolved limb, the ACLD group demonstrated lower vertical ground reaction force (mean difference = 0.08 body weight, p = 0.010, effect size = 0.70) and knee flexion moment (mean difference = 1.32% body weight * height, p = 0.003, effect size = 0.76), during weight acceptance. These results indicate that high muscle co-contraction does not always result in high knee joint loading, which is thought to be associated with knee osteoarthritis. Long-term follow-up is required to evaluate how gait alterations progress in non-osteoarthritic versus osteoarthritic subjects.

KW - ACL

KW - joint forces

KW - knee

KW - muscle co-contraction

KW - musculoskeletal modeling

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85054648989&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85054648989&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/jor.24141

DO - 10.1002/jor.24141

M3 - Article

C2 - 30230006

AN - SCOPUS:85054648989

VL - 37

SP - 104

EP - 112

JO - Journal of Orthopaedic Research

JF - Journal of Orthopaedic Research

SN - 0736-0266

IS - 1

ER -