High-frequency click-evoked otoacoustic emissions and behavioral thresholds in humans

Shawn S. Goodman, Denis F. Fitzpatrick, John C. Ellison, Walt Jesteadt, Douglas H Keefe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Relationships between click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs) and behavioral thresholds have not been explored above 5 kHz due to limitations in CEOAE measurement procedures. New techniques were used to measure behavioral thresholds and CEOAEs up to 16 kHz. A long cylindrical tube of 8 mm diameter, serving as a reflectionless termination, was used to calibrate audiometric stimuli and design a wideband CEOAE stimulus. A second click was presented 15 dB above a probe click level that varied over a 44 dB range, and a nonlinear residual procedure extracted a CEOAE from these click responses. In some subjects (age 14-29 years) with normal hearing up to 8 kHz, CEOAE spectral energy and latency were measured up to 16 kHz. Audiometric thresholds were measured using an adaptive yes-no procedure. Comparison of CEOAE and behavioral thresholds suggested a clinical potential of using CEOAEs to screen for high-frequency hearing loss. CEOAE latencies determined from the peak of averaged, filtered temporal envelopes decreased to 1 ms with increasing frequency up to 16 kHz. Individual CEOAE envelopes included both compressively growing longer-delay components consistent with a coherent-reflection source and linearly or expansively growing shorter-delay components consistent with a distortion source. Envelope delays of both components were approximately invariant with level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1014-1032
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume125
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 16 2009

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thresholds
envelopes
stimuli
auditory defects
spectral emission
hearing
tubes
broadband
probes
energy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

High-frequency click-evoked otoacoustic emissions and behavioral thresholds in humans. / Goodman, Shawn S.; Fitzpatrick, Denis F.; Ellison, John C.; Jesteadt, Walt; Keefe, Douglas H.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 125, No. 2, 16.02.2009, p. 1014-1032.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goodman, Shawn S. ; Fitzpatrick, Denis F. ; Ellison, John C. ; Jesteadt, Walt ; Keefe, Douglas H. / High-frequency click-evoked otoacoustic emissions and behavioral thresholds in humans. In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 2009 ; Vol. 125, No. 2. pp. 1014-1032.
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