Hierarchical and Mediation Analysis of Disparities in Very Short Sleep among Sexual Minority Youth in the U.S., 2015

Hongying Dai, David G. Ingram, Jane B. Taylor

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Abstract

Background: Insufficient sleep is associated with increased risk of chronic diseases, substance use, and unintentional injuries. Little is known about the disparities in short sleep among sexual minority youth. Methods: A nationally representative sample of U.S. students in grades 9–12 (n = 14,703) from the 2015 Youth Risk Behavior Survey was analyzed to examine the prevalence and risk factors of short sleep. Self-reported sleep duration (very short: ≤5 h, short: 6–7 h, normal: ≥8 h per day) were compared by sex group (male vs. female) and sexual orientation (heterosexual, gay, lesbian, bisexual, and unsure). Results: Of all respondents, 88.8% were heterosexual/straight, 2.0% were lesbian or gay, 6.0% were bisexual, and 3.2% were unsure about their sexual identity. Bisexual and unsure girls (36.2%, 95% CI [31.3–41.0] and 33.7%, CI [25.6–41.8], respectively) had a higher prevalence of very short sleep duration than straight girls (19.8%, CI [18.3–21.4]). Gay and unsure boys (38.5%, CI [25.6–51.5] and 33.3%, CI [23.5–32.1], respectively) had a higher prevalence of very short sleep duration than straight boys (16.5%, CI [15.1–17.9]). The effects of sexual minority status on very short sleep duration attenuated when incrementally adjusting for influencing factors, and further analysis identified that feeling sad/hopeless had the largest standardized mediation effect. Conclusions and Relevance: Sexual minority adolescents had a higher prevalence of reporting very short sleep duration as compared to their straight peers, and the effects were mediated by influencing variables including demographic factors, substance use, excessive media use, and experiences of victimization/mental health problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBehavioral Sleep Medicine
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Sleep
Heterosexuality
Sexual Minorities
Crime Victims
Risk-Taking
Sexual Behavior
Statistical Factor Analysis
Mental Health
Emotions
Chronic Disease
Demography
Students
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology

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Hierarchical and Mediation Analysis of Disparities in Very Short Sleep among Sexual Minority Youth in the U.S., 2015. / Dai, Hongying; Ingram, David G.; Taylor, Jane B.

In: Behavioral Sleep Medicine, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Insufficient sleep is associated with increased risk of chronic diseases, substance use, and unintentional injuries. Little is known about the disparities in short sleep among sexual minority youth. Methods: A nationally representative sample of U.S. students in grades 9–12 (n = 14,703) from the 2015 Youth Risk Behavior Survey was analyzed to examine the prevalence and risk factors of short sleep. Self-reported sleep duration (very short: ≤5 h, short: 6–7 h, normal: ≥8 h per day) were compared by sex group (male vs. female) and sexual orientation (heterosexual, gay, lesbian, bisexual, and unsure). Results: Of all respondents, 88.8{\%} were heterosexual/straight, 2.0{\%} were lesbian or gay, 6.0{\%} were bisexual, and 3.2{\%} were unsure about their sexual identity. Bisexual and unsure girls (36.2{\%}, 95{\%} CI [31.3–41.0] and 33.7{\%}, CI [25.6–41.8], respectively) had a higher prevalence of very short sleep duration than straight girls (19.8{\%}, CI [18.3–21.4]). Gay and unsure boys (38.5{\%}, CI [25.6–51.5] and 33.3{\%}, CI [23.5–32.1], respectively) had a higher prevalence of very short sleep duration than straight boys (16.5{\%}, CI [15.1–17.9]). The effects of sexual minority status on very short sleep duration attenuated when incrementally adjusting for influencing factors, and further analysis identified that feeling sad/hopeless had the largest standardized mediation effect. Conclusions and Relevance: Sexual minority adolescents had a higher prevalence of reporting very short sleep duration as compared to their straight peers, and the effects were mediated by influencing variables including demographic factors, substance use, excessive media use, and experiences of victimization/mental health problems.",
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AB - Background: Insufficient sleep is associated with increased risk of chronic diseases, substance use, and unintentional injuries. Little is known about the disparities in short sleep among sexual minority youth. Methods: A nationally representative sample of U.S. students in grades 9–12 (n = 14,703) from the 2015 Youth Risk Behavior Survey was analyzed to examine the prevalence and risk factors of short sleep. Self-reported sleep duration (very short: ≤5 h, short: 6–7 h, normal: ≥8 h per day) were compared by sex group (male vs. female) and sexual orientation (heterosexual, gay, lesbian, bisexual, and unsure). Results: Of all respondents, 88.8% were heterosexual/straight, 2.0% were lesbian or gay, 6.0% were bisexual, and 3.2% were unsure about their sexual identity. Bisexual and unsure girls (36.2%, 95% CI [31.3–41.0] and 33.7%, CI [25.6–41.8], respectively) had a higher prevalence of very short sleep duration than straight girls (19.8%, CI [18.3–21.4]). Gay and unsure boys (38.5%, CI [25.6–51.5] and 33.3%, CI [23.5–32.1], respectively) had a higher prevalence of very short sleep duration than straight boys (16.5%, CI [15.1–17.9]). The effects of sexual minority status on very short sleep duration attenuated when incrementally adjusting for influencing factors, and further analysis identified that feeling sad/hopeless had the largest standardized mediation effect. Conclusions and Relevance: Sexual minority adolescents had a higher prevalence of reporting very short sleep duration as compared to their straight peers, and the effects were mediated by influencing variables including demographic factors, substance use, excessive media use, and experiences of victimization/mental health problems.

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