Heat production and storage are positively correlated with measures of body size/composition and heart rate drift during vigorous running

Robert Buresh, Kris Berg, John Noble

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purposes of this study were to determine the relationships between: (a) measures of body size/composition and heat production/storage, and (b) heat production/storage and heart rate (HR) drift during running at 95% of the velocity that elicited lactate threshold, which was determined for 20 healthy recreational male runners. Subsequently, changes in skin and tympanic temperatures associated with a vigorous 20-min run, HR, and VO2 data were recorded. It was found that heat production was significantly correlated with body mass (r =. 687), lean mass (r =. 749), and body surface area (BSA, r =. 699). Heat storage was significantly correlated with body mass (r =. 519), fat mass (r =. 464), and BSA (r =. 498). The percentage of produced heat stored was significantly correlated with body mass (r =. 427), fat mass (r =. 455), and BSA (r =. 414). Regression analysis showed that the sum of body mass, percentage of body fat, BSA, lean mass, and fat mass accounted for 30% of the variability in heat storage. It was also found that HR drift was significantly correlated with heat storage (r =. 383), percentage of produced heat stored (r =. 433), and core temperature change (r =. 450). It was concluded that heavier runners experienced greater heat production, heat storage, and core temperature increases than lighter runners during vigorous running.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-274
Number of pages8
JournalResearch Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Volume76
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2005

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Keywords

  • Lactate threshold
  • Vo slow component

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Nephrology

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