Health-risk behaviors in a sample of first-time pregnant adolescents

Margaret M Kaiser, Bevely J. Hays

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency of prenatal health-risk behaviors (substance use, sexual risk taking, and prenatal class attendance) among a nonrandom sample of first-time pregnant adolescents. Design: The design is descriptive. Sample: 145 ethnically diverse first-time pregnant adolescents aged 15-18 years. Measurement: Health behavior questions modified from the Center for Disease Control's Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System. Results: The health-risk behavior most modified during pregnancy was alcohol use (64/145 drank but quit and 1/145 did not quit). Of the 52/145 who used street drugs, nine continued despite pregnancy. Of the 75/145 who smoked early in pregnancy, 39 continued. The majority did not use a condom at last sexual intercourse. Approximately half attended a prenatal class and half attended a teen parenting class. Conclusion: Health-risk behaviors captured by birth certificate data are thought to be underreported for all age groups, and the prevalence of health-risk behaviors in this sample of pregnant teens was often greater than the most recent national trend data available. The magnitude of the effects of health-risk behaviors on pregnancy outcomes necessitates improved data gathering to enhance planning and evaluation of research and interventions at community, system, and individual/family levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)483-493
Number of pages11
JournalPublic Health Nursing
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2005

Fingerprint

Risk-Taking
Health
Pregnancy
Birth Certificates
Coitus
Health Behavior
Parenting
Condoms
Street Drugs
Pregnancy Outcome
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Age Groups
Alcohols

Keywords

  • Adolescent pregnancy
  • Class attendance
  • Health-risk behaviors
  • Sexual risk taking
  • Substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Health-risk behaviors in a sample of first-time pregnant adolescents. / Kaiser, Margaret M; Hays, Bevely J.

In: Public Health Nursing, Vol. 22, No. 6, 01.11.2005, p. 483-493.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kaiser, Margaret M ; Hays, Bevely J. / Health-risk behaviors in a sample of first-time pregnant adolescents. In: Public Health Nursing. 2005 ; Vol. 22, No. 6. pp. 483-493.
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