Health care coverage and access to care: The status of Minnesota's veterans

Yvonne C. Jonk, Kathleen Thiede Call, Andrea H. Cutting, Heidi O'Connor, Vishakha Bansiya, Kathleen Harrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to examine veterans' reliance on health care services provided by the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) within Minnesota and estimate the potential effect on uninsurance rates if all eligible veterans relied on VHA coverage. Secondary objectives were to compare veterans and nonveterans' by geographic location, demographic characteristics, health status, and health insurance coverage and to compare insured and uninsured veterans especially with regard to access to care. Research Design: Data are from the 2001 Minnesota Health Access Survey of a stratified random sample of more than 27,000 respondents, of whom 3,500 were self-identified veterans. Although all veterans were eligible to obtain health care services from the VHA in 2001, veterans not reporting VHA coverage and having no other source of insurance coverage were considered uninsured. Differences in weighted population characteristics are reported. Logistic regression analysis is used to identify factors associated with veterans' reliance on VHA coverage. Results: Veterans represented 13.4% of the state's adult population and 9.3% of the state's uninsured nonelderly adult population in 2001. Uninsured veterans were more likely to be single, unemployed, living in rural areas, and reporting constrained access to services than insured veterans. Veterans with a non-VHA source of insurance were less reliant on VHA services. Conclusions: The state's uninsurance rate would significantly decrease if VHA capacity constraints were alleviated and veterans relied on the VHA safety net. If veterans' insurance status matters in states with low uninsurance rates, VHA coverage has broader implications for states with higher veteran concentrations and higher uninsurance rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)769-774
Number of pages6
JournalMedical Care
Volume43
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2005

Fingerprint

Health Services Accessibility
Veterans
Veterans Health
United States Department of Veterans Affairs
Insurance Coverage
Health Services
Delivery of Health Care
Geographic Locations
Population Characteristics
Health Insurance
Health Surveys
Insurance
Population
Health Status

Keywords

  • Insurance coverage
  • Safety net
  • Use of VHA/non-VHA care
  • VHA enrollees

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Jonk, Y. C., Call, K. T., Cutting, A. H., O'Connor, H., Bansiya, V., & Harrison, K. (2005). Health care coverage and access to care: The status of Minnesota's veterans. Medical Care, 43(8), 769-774. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.mlr.0000170403.97264.39

Health care coverage and access to care : The status of Minnesota's veterans. / Jonk, Yvonne C.; Call, Kathleen Thiede; Cutting, Andrea H.; O'Connor, Heidi; Bansiya, Vishakha; Harrison, Kathleen.

In: Medical Care, Vol. 43, No. 8, 01.08.2005, p. 769-774.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jonk, YC, Call, KT, Cutting, AH, O'Connor, H, Bansiya, V & Harrison, K 2005, 'Health care coverage and access to care: The status of Minnesota's veterans', Medical Care, vol. 43, no. 8, pp. 769-774. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.mlr.0000170403.97264.39
Jonk, Yvonne C. ; Call, Kathleen Thiede ; Cutting, Andrea H. ; O'Connor, Heidi ; Bansiya, Vishakha ; Harrison, Kathleen. / Health care coverage and access to care : The status of Minnesota's veterans. In: Medical Care. 2005 ; Vol. 43, No. 8. pp. 769-774.
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