Health care access, utilization, and management in adult Chinese, koreans, and vietnamese with cardiovascular disease and hypertension

Hoang Tran, Van Do, Lorena Baccaglini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Asians are often pooled together when evaluating disparities in health care indicators (access, utilization, and management), though substantial variation may exist across different Asian ethnicities. Objective The aim of this study was to compare health care indicators among Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, and non- Hispanic white (NHW) adults with cardiovascular disease and hypertension (CVD/HTN). Methods We analyzed health care indicators using multivariable logistic regression in a sample of Asians and NHWs with CVD/HTN from the 2011–2012 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS). Results Koreans had the lowest utilization of emergency room (ER) or inpatient hospital services; Vietnamese had the lowest access to a personal doctor; Chinese had the lowest adjusted odds of having seen a doctor in the prior 12 months; and all Asians received fewer written heart disease care plans compared to NHWs. Even when utilization of ER for heart disease appeared to be similar, lack of access to a doctor was a more common reason noted by Asians versus NHWs. However, a lower proportion of Asians reported delays in receiving prescription or care. Accounting for differences across groups did not diminish these disparities. Conclusion Health care indicators varied by race and across Asian ethnicities even after controlling for sociodemographic factors, insurance coverage, and health status. Future studies should consider oversampling other Asian ethnicities and assessing more in depth the potential impact of ethnicityrelated factors on disparities in health care indicators.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)340-348
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 28 2015

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Patient Acceptance of Health Care
hypertension
Cardiovascular Diseases
utilization
health care
Hypertension
Disease
management
Healthcare Disparities
ethnicity
Insurance Coverage
heart disease
Delivery of Health Care
Hospital Emergency Service
Heart Diseases
sociodemographic factors
insurance coverage
health status
Health Surveys
Hispanic Americans

Keywords

  • AsianAmerican
  • Healthcare disparities
  • Healthcare services accessibility
  • Utilization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Health care access, utilization, and management in adult Chinese, koreans, and vietnamese with cardiovascular disease and hypertension",
abstract = "Background Asians are often pooled together when evaluating disparities in health care indicators (access, utilization, and management), though substantial variation may exist across different Asian ethnicities. Objective The aim of this study was to compare health care indicators among Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, and non- Hispanic white (NHW) adults with cardiovascular disease and hypertension (CVD/HTN). Methods We analyzed health care indicators using multivariable logistic regression in a sample of Asians and NHWs with CVD/HTN from the 2011–2012 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS). Results Koreans had the lowest utilization of emergency room (ER) or inpatient hospital services; Vietnamese had the lowest access to a personal doctor; Chinese had the lowest adjusted odds of having seen a doctor in the prior 12 months; and all Asians received fewer written heart disease care plans compared to NHWs. Even when utilization of ER for heart disease appeared to be similar, lack of access to a doctor was a more common reason noted by Asians versus NHWs. However, a lower proportion of Asians reported delays in receiving prescription or care. Accounting for differences across groups did not diminish these disparities. Conclusion Health care indicators varied by race and across Asian ethnicities even after controlling for sociodemographic factors, insurance coverage, and health status. Future studies should consider oversampling other Asian ethnicities and assessing more in depth the potential impact of ethnicityrelated factors on disparities in health care indicators.",
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T1 - Health care access, utilization, and management in adult Chinese, koreans, and vietnamese with cardiovascular disease and hypertension

AU - Tran, Hoang

AU - Do, Van

AU - Baccaglini, Lorena

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Y1 - 2015/9/28

N2 - Background Asians are often pooled together when evaluating disparities in health care indicators (access, utilization, and management), though substantial variation may exist across different Asian ethnicities. Objective The aim of this study was to compare health care indicators among Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, and non- Hispanic white (NHW) adults with cardiovascular disease and hypertension (CVD/HTN). Methods We analyzed health care indicators using multivariable logistic regression in a sample of Asians and NHWs with CVD/HTN from the 2011–2012 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS). Results Koreans had the lowest utilization of emergency room (ER) or inpatient hospital services; Vietnamese had the lowest access to a personal doctor; Chinese had the lowest adjusted odds of having seen a doctor in the prior 12 months; and all Asians received fewer written heart disease care plans compared to NHWs. Even when utilization of ER for heart disease appeared to be similar, lack of access to a doctor was a more common reason noted by Asians versus NHWs. However, a lower proportion of Asians reported delays in receiving prescription or care. Accounting for differences across groups did not diminish these disparities. Conclusion Health care indicators varied by race and across Asian ethnicities even after controlling for sociodemographic factors, insurance coverage, and health status. Future studies should consider oversampling other Asian ethnicities and assessing more in depth the potential impact of ethnicityrelated factors on disparities in health care indicators.

AB - Background Asians are often pooled together when evaluating disparities in health care indicators (access, utilization, and management), though substantial variation may exist across different Asian ethnicities. Objective The aim of this study was to compare health care indicators among Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, and non- Hispanic white (NHW) adults with cardiovascular disease and hypertension (CVD/HTN). Methods We analyzed health care indicators using multivariable logistic regression in a sample of Asians and NHWs with CVD/HTN from the 2011–2012 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS). Results Koreans had the lowest utilization of emergency room (ER) or inpatient hospital services; Vietnamese had the lowest access to a personal doctor; Chinese had the lowest adjusted odds of having seen a doctor in the prior 12 months; and all Asians received fewer written heart disease care plans compared to NHWs. Even when utilization of ER for heart disease appeared to be similar, lack of access to a doctor was a more common reason noted by Asians versus NHWs. However, a lower proportion of Asians reported delays in receiving prescription or care. Accounting for differences across groups did not diminish these disparities. Conclusion Health care indicators varied by race and across Asian ethnicities even after controlling for sociodemographic factors, insurance coverage, and health status. Future studies should consider oversampling other Asian ethnicities and assessing more in depth the potential impact of ethnicityrelated factors on disparities in health care indicators.

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