Headache in the Elderly

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Headache in an elderly patient can be a sign of serious, potentially life-threatening disorders. All patients require a full assessment, including a complete neurologic examination. Particular emphasis should be placed on excluding subarachnoid hemorrhage, subdural hematoma, giant cell arteritis, intracranial neoplasm, cerebrovascular accident, acute-angle-closure glaucoma, and infectious etiologies such as meningitis and encephalitis. Once life-threatening disorders are excluded, the geriatrician can focus on more benign etiologies such as migraine, tension headache, and medication withdrawal. Treatment depends on the underlying etiology. This article discusses headaches that require emergent treatment and then describes more benign etiologies of headaches.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)291-305
Number of pages15
JournalClinics in Geriatric Medicine
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2007

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Headache
Angle Closure Glaucoma
Tension-Type Headache
Subdural Hematoma
Giant Cell Arteritis
Neurologic Examination
Encephalitis
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Migraine Disorders
Meningitis
Brain Neoplasms
Stroke
Therapeutics
Geriatricians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Headache in the Elderly. / Walker, Richard; Wadman, Michael Charles.

In: Clinics in Geriatric Medicine, Vol. 23, No. 2, 01.05.2007, p. 291-305.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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