Handgrip Strength Is Associated with Poorer Cognitive Functioning in Aging Americans

Ryan Mcgrath, Sheria G. Robinson-Lane, Summer Cook, Brian C. Clark, Stephen Herrmann, Melissa Lunsman O'connor, Kyle J Hackney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Measures of handgrip strength may show promise for detecting cognitive erosion during aging. Objective: To determine the associations between lower handgrip strength and poorer cognitive functioning for aging Americans. Methods: There were 13,828 participants aged at least 50 years from the 2006 wave of the Health and Retirement Study included and followed biennially for 8 years. Handgrip strength was assessed with a hand-held dynamometer and cognitive functioning was assessed with a modified version of the Mini-Mental State Examination. Participants aged <65 years with scores 7- 11 had a mild cognitive impairment, ≤6 had a severe cognitive impairment, and ≤11 had any cognitive impairment. Respondents aged ≥65 years with scores 8- 10 had a mild cognitive impairment, ≤7 had a severe cognitive impairment, and ≤10 had any cognitive impairment. Separate covariate-adjusted multilevel logistic models examined the associations between lower handgrip strength and any or severe cognitive impairment. A multilevel ordered logit model analyzed the association between lower handgrip strength and poorer cognitive functioning. Results: Every 5-kg lower handgrip strength was associated with 1.10 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04, 1.15) and 1.18 (CI: 1.04, 1.32) greater odds for any and severe cognitive impairment, respectively. Similarly, every 5-kg lower handgrip strength was associated with 1.10 (CI: 1.05, 1.14) greater odds for poorer cognitive functioning. Conclusions: Measurement of handgrip strength is a simple, risk-stratifying method for helping healthcare providers determine poorer cognitive functioning. Interventions aiming to prevent or delay cognitive dysfunction should also implement measures of handgrip strength as an assessment tool for determining efficacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1187-1196
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume70
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Confidence Intervals
Logistic Models
Cognitive Dysfunction
Retirement
Health Personnel
Hand
Health
Surveys and Questionnaires
Cognitive Aging

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • cognition
  • dementia
  • frailty
  • geriatrics
  • muscle strength
  • muscle weakness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Mcgrath, R., Robinson-Lane, S. G., Cook, S., Clark, B. C., Herrmann, S., O'connor, M. L., & Hackney, K. J. (2019). Handgrip Strength Is Associated with Poorer Cognitive Functioning in Aging Americans. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 70(4), 1187-1196. https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-190042

Handgrip Strength Is Associated with Poorer Cognitive Functioning in Aging Americans. / Mcgrath, Ryan; Robinson-Lane, Sheria G.; Cook, Summer; Clark, Brian C.; Herrmann, Stephen; O'connor, Melissa Lunsman; Hackney, Kyle J.

In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, Vol. 70, No. 4, 01.01.2019, p. 1187-1196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mcgrath, R, Robinson-Lane, SG, Cook, S, Clark, BC, Herrmann, S, O'connor, ML & Hackney, KJ 2019, 'Handgrip Strength Is Associated with Poorer Cognitive Functioning in Aging Americans', Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, vol. 70, no. 4, pp. 1187-1196. https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-190042
Mcgrath R, Robinson-Lane SG, Cook S, Clark BC, Herrmann S, O'connor ML et al. Handgrip Strength Is Associated with Poorer Cognitive Functioning in Aging Americans. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. 2019 Jan 1;70(4):1187-1196. https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-190042
Mcgrath, Ryan ; Robinson-Lane, Sheria G. ; Cook, Summer ; Clark, Brian C. ; Herrmann, Stephen ; O'connor, Melissa Lunsman ; Hackney, Kyle J. / Handgrip Strength Is Associated with Poorer Cognitive Functioning in Aging Americans. In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. 2019 ; Vol. 70, No. 4. pp. 1187-1196.
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abstract = "Background: Measures of handgrip strength may show promise for detecting cognitive erosion during aging. Objective: To determine the associations between lower handgrip strength and poorer cognitive functioning for aging Americans. Methods: There were 13,828 participants aged at least 50 years from the 2006 wave of the Health and Retirement Study included and followed biennially for 8 years. Handgrip strength was assessed with a hand-held dynamometer and cognitive functioning was assessed with a modified version of the Mini-Mental State Examination. Participants aged <65 years with scores 7- 11 had a mild cognitive impairment, ≤6 had a severe cognitive impairment, and ≤11 had any cognitive impairment. Respondents aged ≥65 years with scores 8- 10 had a mild cognitive impairment, ≤7 had a severe cognitive impairment, and ≤10 had any cognitive impairment. Separate covariate-adjusted multilevel logistic models examined the associations between lower handgrip strength and any or severe cognitive impairment. A multilevel ordered logit model analyzed the association between lower handgrip strength and poorer cognitive functioning. Results: Every 5-kg lower handgrip strength was associated with 1.10 (95{\%} confidence interval (CI): 1.04, 1.15) and 1.18 (CI: 1.04, 1.32) greater odds for any and severe cognitive impairment, respectively. Similarly, every 5-kg lower handgrip strength was associated with 1.10 (CI: 1.05, 1.14) greater odds for poorer cognitive functioning. Conclusions: Measurement of handgrip strength is a simple, risk-stratifying method for helping healthcare providers determine poorer cognitive functioning. Interventions aiming to prevent or delay cognitive dysfunction should also implement measures of handgrip strength as an assessment tool for determining efficacy.",
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