Gut permeability and mucosal inflammation: Bad, good or context dependent

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disease. A breach in the mucosal barrier, otherwise known as "leaky gut," is alleged to promote mucosal inflammation by intensifying immune activation. However, interaction between the luminal antigen and mucosal immune system is necessary to maintain mucosal homeostasis. Furthermore, manipulations leading to deregulated gut permeability have resulted in susceptibility in mice to colitis as well as to creating adaptive immunity. These findings implicate a complex but dynamic association between mucosal permeability and immune homeostasis; however, they also emphasize that compromised gut permeability alone may not be sufficient to induce colitis. Emerging evidence further supports the role(s) of proteins associated with the mucosal barrier in epithelial injury and repair: manipulations of associated proteins also modified epithelial differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Taken together, the role of gut permeability and proteins associated in regulating mucosal inflammatory diseases appears to be more complex than previously thought. Herein, we review outcomes from recent mouse models where gut permeability was altered by direct and indirect effects of manipulating mucosal barrier-Associated proteins, to highlight the significance of mucosal permeability and the non-barrier-related roles of these proteins in regulating chronic mucosal inflammatory conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)307-317
Number of pages11
JournalMucosal Immunology
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

Fingerprint

Permeability
Inflammation
Colitis
Proteins
Homeostasis
Adaptive Immunity
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Immune System
Apoptosis
Antigens
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Gut permeability and mucosal inflammation : Bad, good or context dependent. / Ahmad, R.; Sorrell, Michael Floyd; Batra, Surinder Kumar; Dhawan, Punita; Singh, Amar Bahadur.

In: Mucosal Immunology, Vol. 10, No. 2, 01.03.2017, p. 307-317.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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