Gut microbiome composition is linked to whole grain-induced immunological improvements

Inés Martínez, James M. Lattimer, Kelcie L. Hubach, Jennifer A. Case, Junyi Yang, Casey G. Weber, Julie A. Louk, Devin J. Rose, Gayaneh Kyureghian, Daniel A. Peterson, Mark D. Haub, Jens Walter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

194 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The involvement of the gut microbiota in metabolic disorders, and the ability of whole grains to affect both host metabolism and gut microbial ecology, suggest that some benefits of whole grains are mediated through their effects on the gut microbiome. Nutritional studies that assess the effect of whole grains on both the gut microbiome and human physiology are needed. We conducted a randomized cross-over trial with four-week treatments in which 28 healthy humans consumed a daily dose of 60 g of whole-grain barley (WGB), brown rice (BR), or an equal mixture of the two (BR+WGB), and characterized their impact on fecal microbial ecology and blood markers of inflammation, glucose and lipid metabolism. All treatments increased microbial diversity, the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio, and the abundance of the genus Blautia in fecal samples. The inclusion of WGB enriched the genera Roseburia, Bifidobacterium and Dialister, and the species Eubacterium rectale, Roseburia faecis and Roseburia intestinalis. Whole grains, and especially the BR+WGB treatment, reduced plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) and peak postprandial glucose. Shifts in the abundance of Eubacterium rectale were associated with changes in the glucose and insulin postprandial response. Interestingly, subjects with greater improvements in IL-6 levels harbored significantly higher proportions of Dialister and lower abundance of Coriobacteriaceae. In conclusion, this study revealed that a short-term intake of whole grains induced compositional alterations of the gut microbiota that coincided with improvements in host physiological measures related to metabolic dysfunctions in humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)269-280
Number of pages12
JournalISME Journal
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2013

Fingerprint

whole grain foods
barley
digestive system
glucose
microbial ecology
rice
Dialister
Hordeum
brown rice
Eubacterium rectale
metabolism
intestinal microorganisms
Eubacterium
interleukin-6
Ecology
Glucose
Coriobacteriaceae
Roseburia
blood
lipid

Keywords

  • gut microbiota
  • inflammation
  • metabolic disorders
  • whole grains

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Martínez, I., Lattimer, J. M., Hubach, K. L., Case, J. A., Yang, J., Weber, C. G., ... Walter, J. (2013). Gut microbiome composition is linked to whole grain-induced immunological improvements. ISME Journal, 7(2), 269-280. https://doi.org/10.1038/ismej.2012.104

Gut microbiome composition is linked to whole grain-induced immunological improvements. / Martínez, Inés; Lattimer, James M.; Hubach, Kelcie L.; Case, Jennifer A.; Yang, Junyi; Weber, Casey G.; Louk, Julie A.; Rose, Devin J.; Kyureghian, Gayaneh; Peterson, Daniel A.; Haub, Mark D.; Walter, Jens.

In: ISME Journal, Vol. 7, No. 2, 01.03.2013, p. 269-280.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Martínez, I, Lattimer, JM, Hubach, KL, Case, JA, Yang, J, Weber, CG, Louk, JA, Rose, DJ, Kyureghian, G, Peterson, DA, Haub, MD & Walter, J 2013, 'Gut microbiome composition is linked to whole grain-induced immunological improvements', ISME Journal, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 269-280. https://doi.org/10.1038/ismej.2012.104
Martínez I, Lattimer JM, Hubach KL, Case JA, Yang J, Weber CG et al. Gut microbiome composition is linked to whole grain-induced immunological improvements. ISME Journal. 2013 Mar 1;7(2):269-280. https://doi.org/10.1038/ismej.2012.104
Martínez, Inés ; Lattimer, James M. ; Hubach, Kelcie L. ; Case, Jennifer A. ; Yang, Junyi ; Weber, Casey G. ; Louk, Julie A. ; Rose, Devin J. ; Kyureghian, Gayaneh ; Peterson, Daniel A. ; Haub, Mark D. ; Walter, Jens. / Gut microbiome composition is linked to whole grain-induced immunological improvements. In: ISME Journal. 2013 ; Vol. 7, No. 2. pp. 269-280.
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