Group B coxsackievirus virulence

Steven Tracy, C. Gauntt

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

That which is understood of virulence phenotypes in the picornaviruses derives in large part from studies of artificially attenuating phenotypes rather than through examination of naturally occurring virus strains. The CVB replicate well in a variety of different murine and human cell cultures, making them excellent viruses with which to engage the problem of how the host environment interacts with specific viral genetics to promote varying efficiencies of viral replication. It is not known how highly virulent CVB strains may arise but evidence suggests such strains are not the norm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGroup B Coxsackieviruses
EditorsSteven Tracy, Kristen Drescher, Steven Oberste
Pages49-63
Number of pages15
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008

Publication series

NameCurrent Topics in Microbiology and Immunology
Volume323
ISSN (Print)0070-217X

Fingerprint

Human Enterovirus B
Virulence
Viruses
Picornaviridae
Phenotype
Cell Culture Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Tracy, S., & Gauntt, C. (2008). Group B coxsackievirus virulence. In S. Tracy, K. Drescher, & S. Oberste (Eds.), Group B Coxsackieviruses (pp. 49-63). (Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology; Vol. 323). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-75546-3-3

Group B coxsackievirus virulence. / Tracy, Steven; Gauntt, C.

Group B Coxsackieviruses. ed. / Steven Tracy; Kristen Drescher; Steven Oberste. 2008. p. 49-63 (Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology; Vol. 323).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Tracy, S & Gauntt, C 2008, Group B coxsackievirus virulence. in S Tracy, K Drescher & S Oberste (eds), Group B Coxsackieviruses. Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology, vol. 323, pp. 49-63. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-75546-3-3
Tracy S, Gauntt C. Group B coxsackievirus virulence. In Tracy S, Drescher K, Oberste S, editors, Group B Coxsackieviruses. 2008. p. 49-63. (Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-75546-3-3
Tracy, Steven ; Gauntt, C. / Group B coxsackievirus virulence. Group B Coxsackieviruses. editor / Steven Tracy ; Kristen Drescher ; Steven Oberste. 2008. pp. 49-63 (Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology).
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