Graphene electronics, unzipped

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Superthin sheets with extraordinary electronic properties can be produced by unrolling tiny carbon tubes. Chemists apply a mixture of sulfuric acid and potassium permanganate. This reagent pries open some of the carbon-carbon bonds, opening a breach in the hexagonal cells. Continued chemical reactions proceed down the tube, opening a pathway along the chicken-wire structure, causing it to unfurl all the way down its length, producing a conductive ribbon that is extraordinarily long and thin. A graphene field-effect transistor, consists of a single ribbon of graphene with one side laid down on a positive electrode, the other laid down on a negative one. A third electrode, or gate, can then modulate the flow of electrons through the ribbon, turning the device into a switch. Although creating graphene sheets using adhesive tape may be a fine laboratory technique, it's hardly practical for mass production. A group at Stanford has used plasma jets to blow the tops off multiwalled carbon nanotubes while protecting the sides of the tubes under a polymer film.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number5605889
Pages (from-to)28-33
Number of pages6
JournalIEEE Spectrum
Volume47
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010

Fingerprint

Graphene
Electronic equipment
Carbon
Plasma jets
Electrodes
Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCN)
Field effect transistors
Sulfuric acid
Polymer films
Electronic properties
Tapes
Potassium
Chemical reactions
Adhesives
Switches
Wire
Electrons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Graphene electronics, unzipped. / Sinitskii, Alexander; Tour, James.

In: IEEE Spectrum, Vol. 47, No. 11, 5605889, 01.11.2010, p. 28-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sinitskii, Alexander ; Tour, James. / Graphene electronics, unzipped. In: IEEE Spectrum. 2010 ; Vol. 47, No. 11. pp. 28-33.
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