Getting to the heart of the matter: Age-related changes in diastolic heart function in the longest-lived rodent, the naked mole rat

Kelly M. Grimes, Merry L. Lindsey, Jonathan A.L. Gelfond, Rochelle Buffenstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The naked mole rat is an extremely long-lived (>31 years) small (35 g) rodent. Moreover, it maintains good health for most of its long life. We hypothesized that naked mole rats also show attenuated cardiac aging. With age, cardiac muscle can become less compliant, causing a decline in early diastolic filling (E) and a compensatory increase in atrial contraction-induced late filling (A). This results in decreased left ventricular E/A ratio. Doppler imaging showed no significant differences in E/A ratios (p = .48) among old (18-20 years) breeders and nonbreeders despite differences in estrogen levels. A cross-sectional study of 1-to 20-year-old naked mole rats (n = 76) revealed that E/A ratios declined with age in females (n = 40; p = .002) but not in males (n = 36; p = 0.45). Despite this, neither gender shows increased morbidity or mortality with age. These findings suggest that, notwithstanding the previously observed high lipid peroxidation in heart tissue, NMRs must possess mechanisms to stave off progression to fatal cardiac disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)384-394
Number of pages11
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume67 A
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Mole Rats
Rodentia
Lipid Peroxidation
Heart Diseases
Myocardium
Estrogens
Cross-Sectional Studies
Morbidity
Mortality
Health

Keywords

  • Cardiac imaging
  • Diastolic dysfunction
  • Hypogonadic
  • Left ventricular function
  • Naked mole rat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Getting to the heart of the matter : Age-related changes in diastolic heart function in the longest-lived rodent, the naked mole rat. / Grimes, Kelly M.; Lindsey, Merry L.; Gelfond, Jonathan A.L.; Buffenstein, Rochelle.

In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, Vol. 67 A, No. 4, 01.04.2012, p. 384-394.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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